chronic disease Archives - Mantachie Rural Health Care, Inc.
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Six Foods You Thought Were Healthy But Aren’t

Six Foods You Thought Were Healthy But Aren’t

Six Foods You Thought Were Healthy But Aren't

Eating healthy and getting plenty of exercise are two lifestyle choices we heavily promote here at Mantachie Rural Health Care. Learning to eat healthy is challenging–especially in today’s world that offers an overwhelming amount of food options. Many of today’s foods, particularly pre-packaged, store-bought foods, are promoted as “healthy” choices but are actually worse than those obviously unhealthy options like soda and candy. If you’re trying to cut out unnecessary sugar, carbs, or calories from your diet, you’ll want to avoid the following six foods you thought were healthy.

Orange juice and other fruit juices.

The problem with orange juice and other fruit juices is that most of them are made from concentrate–meaning all the “good stuff” in the fruits that make these juices are stripped away and replaced with processed sugar. In fact, juices have as much sugar in each serving as a can of soda. 

Think making your own orange juice will make it healthier? Think again. The juicing fruits of orange are naturally sweet and contain very little fiber resulting in a spike in your blood sugar. The healthiest option is to switch to fruit-infused water. You can easily make your own by adding any of your favorite fruits to a pitcher of water and then refrigerating the water for several hours or overnight to allow the fruits to infuse.

Baked potato

A plain baked potato is high in calories and carbs. Start adding butter, sour cream, and other toppings and you’re adding even more junk to the mix. Opt for a sweet potato instead. 

Store-bought smoothies

Turns out saving yourself time with store-bought smoothies doesn’t actually save your diet. Even the “green” smoothies are high in sugar and low in the actual good stuff that comes from fruits and veggies that supposedly make up these smoothies. Your best bet is to eat your daily servings of fruits and vegetables and make sure you include a serving of greens with each meal. If you must have a smoothie, make your own. Your veggie portions should outweigh your fruit 3:1 and we advise adding flaxseed, chia seeds, or nuts for fiber. 

Flavored yogurt

There’s a reason healthy diets specify plain Greek yogurt instead of suggesting any yogurt on the dairy shelf. None, and we mean none, of the flavored yogurts you find at the grocery store are actually healthy. Like so many other foods that are advertised as healthy when they’re not, flavored yogurts are high in sugar. Satisfy your taste for yogurt by topping a serving of plain Greek yogurt with your choice of fresh fruit. 

Whole wheat

A few decades ago, whole wheat bread was touted as a healthy alternative to white bread. Health experts quickly found out that wasn’t quite the case, however. Actually, whole wheat contains so much sugar it raises your glucose levels faster than most candy bars. 

Dried Fruits

Much like other foods on our list, dried fruits are made unhealthy thanks to too much sugar made from the drying process. Always choose fresh fruit when you’re craving a fruity snack. 

Confused about what’s really nutritious and what’s not? You’re not alone. Our clinic has a registered dietician on staff. Contact us to make an appointment Erica Witcher, RD, CDE.

How to Stay Safe at the Clinic during Non-Coronavirus Health Visits

How to Stay Safe at the Clinic during Non-Coronavirus Health Visit

As we write this, the entire state of Mississippi is experiencing an upswing in confirmed coronavirus diagnosis. It’s more important now than ever to practice CDC guidelines to stay safe and help slow the spread of COVID-19. Staying home and avoiding unnecessary trips to public places including health facilities are among the steps we should take to slow the spread of the virus. But when you become sick with a non-coronavirus related illness or need a prescription refilled, a health visit is unavoidable. Here’s what you can do to stay safe at the clinic.

Find out your clinic’s safety requirements before your visit. 

Most clinics are taking extreme precautions and measures to protect their patients and staff. Find out your clinic’s policies on masks and social distancing, as well as their cleaning and sanitizing protocols. Most clinics will have restrictions in place regarding how many people are allowed inside and how many visitors can accompany a patient even for a non-coronavirus health visit. Expect temperature checks and symptom screenings at every clinic entrance. 

Ask about their protocol for possible coronavirus patients.

Knowing what your clinic is doing to protect you and others from exposure to coronavirus is one way to ease any anxiety you have about your visit. Every clinic should have a protocol in place that keeps patients with coronavirus-related symptoms totally isolated.

Take your own protective measures.

Do your part to protect yourself and help slow the spread of coronavirus. Wear a mask to the clinic and other public places. Sanitize or wash your hands for at least 20 seconds after touching public surfaces. Avoid touching your face, especially your eyes, nose, and mouth and stay 6 feet away from others. 

Mantachie Rural Health Care is committed to protecting you and all of our patients and staff. If you are sick or have an urgent health matter, don’t put off visiting your provider because of coronavirus fears. A known illness or emergency can be more dangerous to your health than the possibility of a virus. We are taking every measure possible to keep our clinic safe. Request an appointment with us at 662-282-4226.

Read next: 4 Dangers to Skipping Your Child’s Wellness Check-up

Chronic Lyme Disease Highlight Reasons to Prevent Tick Bites

Chronic Lyme Disease Highlight Reasons to Prevent Tick Bites

We’re all happy to see some sunshine and spend some time outside. As we’re recovering from quarantine and continue to practice social distancing, outdoor activities have become even more important this summer. A lot of focus continues to remain on the coronavirus, but that doesn’t mean other diseases have taken a backseat. Now it’s time for your yearly reminder to beware of tick bites which can cause Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

Deer ticks, particularly prevalent in our neck of the woods, are the culprit for Lyme disease. Lyme can be easily treated if caught early, but some patients may suffer long-term consequences of the illness especially if it’s not caught early.

Initial Symptoms

After removing a tick, many people will notice a small, red bump similar to a mosquito bite. This skin irritation is normal and nothing to be concerned about. Complications from that tick bite develop anytime from 3 to 30 after the bite. The most common sign of Lyme disease is a bulls-eye rash at the site of the bite. It expands over the course of several days and may reach 12” in diameter. The rash isn’t painful or itchy. 

Not every case of Lyme disease includes this tell-tale rash. If you do not have the rash, but have the following symptoms it’s time to see your doctor:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Fatigue 
  • Body aches
  • Headache
  • Neck stiffness
  • Swollen lymph nodes

Although many of these symptoms are similar to the Coronavirus, one noticeable difference is Lyme disease does not cause respiratory problems while COVID-19 does.

Antibiotics are the recommended treatment for Lyme disease. Most patients who receive treatment recover with no additional complications.

Chronic Lyme Disease

Even if you have symptoms that disappear without a doctor’s visit, you need to visit your provider if you’ve had a tick bite or been in wooded or grassy areas where ticks like to gather. You may have had a tick bite that you weren’t aware of. Untreated Lyme disease can spread throughout your body and cause long-term health problems. Medical professionals estimate 10-20% of people who receive adequate treatment for Lyme disease continue to have symptoms for weeks, months, and sometimes years after the infection.

Chronic Lyme Disease symptoms include:

  • fatigue
  • restless sleep
  • pain
  • aching joints or muscles
  • pain or swelling in the knees, shoulders, elbows, and other large joints
  • decreased short-term memory or ability to concentrate
  • speech problems

Because these symptoms overlap with many other illnesses, people with chronic Lyme disease are often misdiagnosed. That’s why it’s important to tell your doctor if you’ve experienced a tick bite, even if you don’t have the bulls-eye rash afterward.

Some doctors believe Lyme disease triggers an autoimmune response in some patients which causes additional damage to their body and allows the symptoms to linger.

We currently do not have a specific test or treatment for chronic Lyme disease. That’s the bad news. In good news, your doctor can work with you to get a diagnosis and treat your symptoms. Your doctor may do antibody tests and prescribe medications to treat your symptoms. 

Prevention

The best way to prevent Lyme disease is to avoid deer ticks’ natural habitats like wooded areas and tall grassy areas. But let’s be real. We live in Mississippi. We know camping, fishing, and hunting are our favorite pastimes. With the closure of many indoor activities this summer, the great outdoors will be even more enticing. You can take steps to protect yourself while you enjoy nature.

  • Cover up with long pants and long sleeves when you’re in wooded, grassy areas.
  • Stick to trails and avoid tall grassy areas.
  • Keep your dog on a leash.
  • Apply insect repellent with 20% or higher DEET concentration.
  • Tick proof your yard by mowing regularly and stacking wood in dry, sunny areas.
  • Check your clothing, yourself, your kids, and your pets for ticks after being outside, especially if you’ve been camping, fishing, hiking, or hunting.
  • Remove any tick as soon as you find it. A tick must be attached for 36-48 hours in order to transmit Lyme disease. 
  • Don’t assume you are immuned because you had Lyme disease once. You can be re-infected.

If you’ve experienced a tick bite or have any symptoms of Lyme disease, please contact our office for an appointment with one of our providers. 


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