(662) 282-4226
Open hours: Mon 7:30am – 7:00pm, T/W/Th 7:30am – 5:30pm, Fri 7:30am – 4:00pm
Healthy Boundaries in Recovery

Healthy Boundaries in Recovery

Boundaries are important in any relationship, but they become especially important when you are in recovery from addiction or other mental health conditions. Today, we’re taking a look at the importance of healthy boundaries in recovery and how to set and enforce them. 

What are Healthy Boundaries?

Boundaries are physical, mental, and emotional limits set to protect yourself and others in a relationship. They help us define who we are while allowing others to be who they are. Boundaries also keep you from being taken advantage of or manipulated. 

Boundaries, like anything else, can be unhealthy. Unhealthy boundaries may include abandoning your personal beliefs or values for acceptance, establishing new relationships without considering how they will affect your recovery, and trusting no one or everyone. Knowing the difference between healthy boundaries and unhealthy boundaries is essential to maintaining your recovery. 

Healthy boundaries basically look like the opposite of unhealthy boundaries. Healthy boundaries include:

  • Carefully evaluating the benefits and drawbacks of each relationship
  • Maintaining your personal beliefs and values regardless of other’s opinions
  • Saying no to gifts, favors, and actions that do not support your recovery
  • Clearly and respectfully expressing what you need or want
  • Developing appropriate trust with others
  • Treating yourself with respect and kindness

Now that you know what healthy boundaries look like it’s time to set the boundaries you need and implement them. Key emphasis on the implementation of these boundaries. Boundaries do no good if you don’t enforce them. Setting and enforcing boundaries looks like this:

  • Establishing a self “bill of rights” such as a right to your own thoughts, emotions, values, and beliefs and right to express how you want to be treated
  • Identifying sobriety risk factors including obvious ones like avoiding a bar if you are an alcoholic and less obvious triggers like watching a football game with friends
  • Setting the boundaries based of your bill of rights and recovery risk factors
  • Enforcing the boundaries and remaining accountable
  • Respecting other people’s boundaries

Need more support in  your addiction recovery? We can help. Call 662-282-4226 to schedule a visit. 

Ditch the New Year’s Resolutions and Choose Healthy Habits Instead

Ditch the New Year's Resolutions and Choose Healthy Habits Instead

Happy New Year and hello, 2022! Can you believe a new year is here again? While we’re still processing 2020 and 2021, another year has rolled upon us, and with it more plans for this to finally be the year you stick to your new year’s resolutions. Great news! We’re here to help you do just that in today’s blog.

Stick to Your New Year’s Resolutions…by Ditching Them!

The reason most of us can’t stick to our new year’s resolutions is that we set the bar too high when we make them. For instance, setting a resolution of losing fifty pounds isn’t unrealistic but it is overwhelming without realistic goals set to get there. Instead of setting resolutions we recommend focusing on setting healthy habits that will ultimately help you reach those lofty resolutions.

Healthy Habits and How to Make Them Routine

According to Healthline, it takes anywhere from eighteen to 254 days to create a new habit and around 66 days for the habit to become automatic. So don’t give up if it takes you longer than two and a half weeks to make your habit stick. The best way to do this is to set small habit goals you can actually keep. 

The very first step you should take to reach your goals is to get out a notebook and pen and write your goals down. Multiple studies have shown that writing down your goals brings more success in reaching them. We recommend keeping a journal so you can track your changes and results. Next, add your goals to your daily schedule. All smartphones come with a calendar option that you can use to set reminders and even schedule your goals for your day. Much like simply writing down your goals, adding them into your daily schedule makes it more likely you’ll stick to them.

We’ll stick to weight loss goals for example. First, you don’t want to just set a goal to lose x amount of pounds. There are plenty of ways to lose weight including unhealthy ways like fad diets and dangerous weight loss drugs. While not all weight loss drugs are “bad” even some of those prescribed by a healthcare provider have some not so enjoyable side effects. People who use fad diets and weight loss medicine to lose weight tend to gain that weight back as soon as they stop the diet or drug. 

The best way to lose weight and keep it off is to change your diet and lifestyle. That seems like another one of those lofty resolutions that are impossible to achieve but the truth is, you can change your lifestyle and diet by making small attainable changes that add up in a big way. If part of your weight problem is that you are inactive, set a small goal to start walking or performing another physical activity for 30 minutes a day, two to three times per week. Once your new physical activity becomes routine for you, you can increase your activity goals. 

If you need to make changes to an unhealthy diet, start with one change at a time like cutting out refined sugar and replacing it with healthy options like honey. Cutting out processed sugar will result in weight loss which will encourage you to stick to your new healthy habit and keep going with new goals like adding one more serving of vegetables to your weekly diet. 

One healthy habit we recommend for all of our patients is the habit of visiting your healthcare provider for checkups even when you are not sick. Wellness visits keep you healthy with important screenings and exams that inform your provider about the current state of your health. Screenings performed during these visits provide early detection of serious conditions and diseases.

Can’t remember the last time you visited your Mantachie Rural Healthcare provider for a checkup? There is no better time than right now to schedule your next visit. Click here to schedule your appointment!

How Vacations Help You Stay Healthy…Plus Ideas for Relaxing Staycations!

Ah,  vacations. Seems like we’re all constantly dreaming of our next getaway. Turns out there’s a good reason for wanting more time off or away. Science says vacations help you stay healthy, even staycations have their benefits! Here’s how:

Vacations relieve stress.

The pressures of everyday life can set off stress hormones including cortisol and epinephrine. Over time, these same hormones can lead to depression, weight gain, poor sleep habits, and other serious health problems. 

Getting away makes you feel happier.

You know how you instantly get in a better mood the minute you hit the road to begin a vacation? That feel-good mood often carries on for weeks after as a post-vacation buzz. The key to staying happy is about how often you get away rather than how long. 

Time off improves your heart health.

Taking time off from work can reduce your risk of coronary artery disease, better known as heart disease. According to WebMD, one study shows that time off for a staycation is linked to lowered blood sugar levels and higher levels of good cholesterol. 

Vacations bring better sleep.

Plan your trip in advance for better sleep before, during, and after your vacation. Take advantage of the break from everyday chores and responsibilities and get in as many naps and late sleep as possible. 

Getaways help you recharge your energy and focus.

Having trouble concentrating at work? It’s time for a vacation. Even a staycation can leave you re-energized and ready to tackle any task coming your way.

Time off strengthens your immune system.

Remember those stress hormones we mentioned earlier? Those hormones can also weaken your immune system, leaving you more susceptible to infections and other illnesses. Taking a break helps keep those hormones in check.

Vacations help you live longer.

From reducing your risk of infections and conditions like heart disease to lowering your stress level, time off or away from the everyday routine can lengthen your lifespan. 

Trips strengthen relationships.

Studies have shown that couples who travel together are happier than those who don’t and are both individually more physically and mentally fit than others. If your relationship with your spouse or another loved one could use room for improvement, try traveling together for the ultimate bonding experience. 

Relaxing Staycations

We get it. There isn’t always room in the budget to save up for a vacation. Good thing there are plenty of staycation ideas that are fun, relaxing, and still offer a break from everyday life. Here are a few of our ideas:

  • Visit your local and state parks. We promise there is a state park within a short driving distance of your hometown. And if it’s still too far, pack a picnic and head to your favorite local park to spend the day basking in the sunlight and feeding ducks. In North Mississippi, try your hand at disc golf at Tombigbee State Park just south of Tupelo or canoe Bear Creek or hike a trail at Tishomingo State Park in Tishomingo County. Camp out at Trace State Park in Belden or hit the highway to Holly Springs for a fun day at Wall Doxey State Park. Wall Doxey and JP Coleman, located at the northeasternmost tip of Mississippi are especially fun for boaters. 
  • Host a backyard campout. Invite a few friends or keep it just the family. Leave the household responsibilities inside, gather your camping gear, and head out back to set up camp. This is possibly the easiest camping trip you’ll ever take because everything you need is already there! You may think your backyard isn’t far away enough but just getting outside improves your mood and your health. 
  • Plan a no-connection day or weekend. Tell your friends and loved ones that you’re cutting ties with all things digital for a day or a weekend if you can swing it. Spend the day reading a book, practicing a hobby, or channeling your creative side. We know you may need to check your phone occasionally for missed calls or texts, but keep those phone checks to a minimum. Simply unplugging for a while can help you recharge and refocus.
  • “Tour” a nearby town. Mississippi and all of the great states that make America have a slew of amazing little towns that are full of surprises. Pick a nearby town on the map and start researching things to do, places to eat and shop, and other fun adventures. New Albany is a great place right here in North Mississippi that offers unique shopping and eating opportunities along with fun outdoor activities like the Tanglefoot Trail. Or you can travel a little closer to Tupelo, North Mississippi’s cultural hub and home of the King of Rock n Roll. Dine on some of the best food in the state, visit the Elvis Presley Museum and Birthplace, and spend some time at Veterans or Ballard Park. 

How to Prevent Lung Disease

Lung disease refers to any disorder affecting the lungs. These illnesses include but are not limited to asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), infections including pneumonia and influenza, and lung cancer. Lung disease is a common cause of death in both men and women. Thankfully, you can prevent or reduce your risk of developing lung disease with these steps.

Signs and Symptoms of Lung Disease

One of the best ways to reduce your risk of a disease is to get educated on its causes and symptoms, as well as ways to prevent it. Signs and symptoms of lung disease include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Feeling like you aren’t getting enough air
  • Persistent, chronic cough
  • Coughing up blood or mucus
  • Pain or discomfort when breathing 

Causes and Prevention

Although it is possible for lung disease to develop with no known cause, most cases can be traced back to a certain cause. Smoking any type of tobacco or marijuana product and exposure to asbestos, radon, and air pollution are the most common causes of lung disease. Preventing these exposures are part of the many steps you can take to reduce your risk of lung disease. Prevention steps include:

  • Quitting or never starting smoking.
  • Avoiding exposure to secondhand smoke. Ask smokers to take it outside both at home and in the workplace. Avoid public places that allow smoking.
  • Test for radon. Exposure to high levels of radon can lead to lung disease. Test kits are available in most hardware stores and you can visit the Environmental Protection Agency’s website to learn more about dealing with radon
  • Avoid exposure to asbestos. Workers who are exposed to insulation and other materials containing asbestos as well as mechanics who work on car brakes and clutches are at risk for exposure. Wear a mask and protective clothing and ask your employer about other ways to reduce exposure to asbestos.
  • Protect yourself from dust or fumes. Those many masks you bought during the pandemic can also reduce your risk of lung disease by reducing your exposure to dust and fumes during certain household chores or work duties.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Studies have shown that a diet rich in fruits and veggies helps prevent lung disease.
  • Ask your healthcare provider if you should get a spirometry test. This test measures how much air you can breathe in and out as well as how fast you can blow air out. 
  • Ask your provider about vaccinations for the flu, pneumonia, and other infections that can lead to lung disease. 

Are you concerned about your risk of lung disease? Your Mantachie Rural Health Care provider can help. Schedule a visit to discuss your concerns and get tested for certain lung conditions. 

The Truth About Drug Addiction Overdose and Recovery

September is National Recovery Month. It’s a time to bring awareness to the importance of recovery from a drug or alcohol addiction or a mental health trauma. 

Why Addiction Recovery and Overdose Awareness is Important for Everyone

Since 1999, nearly 841,000 people have died from a drug overdose. In 2019 alone, over 70,500 overdose deaths occurred in the United States. That number continues to increase each year and our country hasn’t experienced a significant decrease in overdose deaths in many years.

If these numbers aren’t reason enough to care about drug addiction overdoses and recovery, perhaps understanding that drug addiction can affect any person from any walk of life will get your attention. That’s right, you and your family members are not exempt from experiencing drug or alcohol addiction no matter how good of a lifestyle you try to live. It can and does happen to all types of people.

Drug overdoses are a leading cause of injury death in the US among people ages 25 to 64. Adults aren’t the only ones at risk, however. More than 4,770 teens also died from a drug overdose in 2019. Nearly 3,320 teenage boys passed away from a drug overdose that year while just under 1,500 teen girls also died from the same cause. The overwhelming majority of these deaths were caused by opioids. 

What You Need to Know About Opioids and Overdoses

Opioids, especially synthetic opioids, are the number one cause of overdose deaths in the United States. Synthetic opioids, excluding methadone, accounted for nearly 73% of opioid-related overdose deaths in 2019. In total, opioids were involved in nearly 50,000 overdose deaths that same year. 

Overdoses typically occur within 1-3 hours of using the drug and despite what many falsely believe, an overdose can happen the very first time you use a substance like opioids or amphetamines. Mixing opiate drugs with other depressants like alcohol or benzodiazepines greatly increases the risk of an overdose death as does combining them with a psychostimulant like methamphetamine. Using pure heroin after regularly using heroin that has been “cut” with another substance like sugar can also lead to an overdose.

The Truth About Recovery and Overdosing

Relapsing after spending time not using your drug of choice also increases your risk of overdose death. That’s why support during recovery from drug addiction or alcoholism is so important to success. Addicts are more likely to relapse if they feel they lack a support system or are still receiving criticism for their past choices from those who should be lending their support. 

Addicts are considered in remission from substance addiction five years after addiction recovery begins. If you relapse and survive, don’t let your recurrence be a reason to wallow in your addiction. Recurrence is normal for most addicts but doesn’t mean they aren’t capable of staying sober. It can take time for an addict to adjust to their new life post-addiction. The important thing to remember is not to give up hope no matter if you are an addict or a loved one of an addict.

Like with other health conditions, early intervention can lead to earlier remission from addiction. If you or someone you love has recently started a new drug addiction, there is still time to get on the path to a faster recovery. 

You should know that there is no one perfect path to recovery. Many addicts find pharmacological, social, and psychological treatments to be helpful while some are able to recover without formal help. Any of these options are acceptable as long as they truly lead to remission. 

Addiction treatment and counseling is one of several behavioral health services we offer at Mantachie Rural Health Care. For more information or to make an appointment, click here.

How Food Choices Affect Your Cancer Risk

“You are what you eat!” We’ve all heard that phrase at some point in our lives and thought it might sound silly, the phrase couldn’t be more true. What we eat influences our health greater than any other influences like our diet, lifestyle choices, and environmental factors. The foods we consume affect every part of our bodies from our brains to our bones. Diet choices can lead to certain health conditions or make them worse. Type II diabetes is a great example of a health condition affected by food choices. Another serious disease your diet can lead to is cancer. That’s right. Your daily food choices affect your cancer risk. 

How Unhealthy Food Choices Affect Your Cancer

Science and the medical community still have many unanswered questions about the links between food choices and cancer. One link we are sure of is between red or processed meat and cancer. Consuming any amount of processed meat and more than eighteen ounces of red meat each week strongly influences your cancer risk. Red meats include beef, pork, or lamb. Processed meats include but are not limited to bacon, sausage, lunch meats, and hot dogs. 

Processed sugar is another food strongly linked to higher cancer risk. Diets that are high in sugary beverages such as sodas, juices, and sports drinks, as well as processed sugary snacks like cookies and candies are bad for your health in a number of ways. Even “healthier” choices like granola and fruit and grain bars as well as “sugar-free” beverages are still high in sugar or artificial sweeteners. 

What to Eat to Lower Your Cancer Risk

Healthy eating habits aren’t just good for your waistline, they can actually lower your risk of developing certain health conditions and diseases including cancer. A healthy diet is rich in plant-based foods, antioxidants, and dietary fiber. A healthy dinner plate is filled with colorful veggies and fruit, whole grains, and one protein-filled food like fish, poultry, or beans. 

Plant-based foods are your best fighters against cancer and other diseases. These foods contain naturally occurring substances called phytonutrients. Phytonutrients include:

  • Carotenoids, or carotenes, found in red, orange, yellow, and some dark green veggies
  • Polyphenols, found in herbs, spices, veggies, tea, coffee, chocolate, nuts, berries, apples, onions, and other sources
  • Allium compounds, found in chives, garlic, leeks, and onions

Plant-based foods are also rich in antioxidants. Antioxidants protect against oxidants, which cause cellular damage and increases your risk of cancer. Examples of antioxidants include beta carotene, selenium, and vitamins C and E. Other vitamins and minerals, such as calcium, iodine, and vitamins A, D, K, and B also contain antioxidants.

Dietary fiber is also essential for lowering cancer risks. Fiber helps nourish a healthy community of microbes, better known as microbiomes. Healthy microbiomes are linked to lower cancer risk. Foods that are high in dietary fiber include whole grains and seeds, whole-grain bread and pasta, beans, lentils, split peas, and fruits and veggies.

Shopping Tips for a Healthier Diet

Before we go, we’ll leave you with a shopping tip for your next grocery store visit. Stick to shopping the outer aisles. Fresh foods like produce, meats, and dairy products are always found in the outer aisles or boundaries of grocery stores. The inner aisles are where you will find the majority of processed, sugary, and high-fat foods. The only inner aisles you should visit are aisles containing coffee, tea, and dry beans and peas. Don’t tempt yourself by visiting other inner aisles like the baking and snack aisles. 

One more shopping tip for healthier eating habits is to make a list before you head to the grocery stores. Sure, you may remember to restock the milk and bananas but keeping a list will help you stay on track and away from impulse buys that often come with unhealthy food choices. If grocery pick-up or delivery is available in your area, consider these options, too. You can shop online according to your list without the temptations of unhealthy foods being all around you. Plus, pick-up and delivery will save you time that could be spent on cultivating a garden of fresh fruits and vegetables or preparing healthy meals for your family. 

Have more questions about your diet and cancer risk? Your healthcare provider is an excellent source of information and advice. Annual wellness visits are the perfect time to discuss diet changes and health concerns with your provider. As an added bonus, patients of Mantachie Rural Health Care can request to speak with our registered dietitian during their appointment for no extra cost. Click here to request a visit with your Mantachie Rural Healthcare provider today. 

.

How Vaccines Have Improved Over the Years

Vaccines have come a long way since the “father of vaccines” Edward Jenner first successfully developed a smallpox vaccine in 1796. It wasn’t until the mid to late 1940s that the smallpox vaccine and a vaccine to prevent diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis were mass-produced. By the late 1960s, vaccines for polio, measles, mumps, and rubella were also developed and distributed. Vaccines have improved over the years as new studies and developments revealed the need for changes.

As happy as people were to finally have protection against some of the world’s most devastating illnesses, many became concerned about the safety of vaccines.

Patients began to express concern about the possible adverse effects of vaccines and some claimed that they or someone they knew had become injured or ill after being inoculated. By the time the 1970s rolled around, demand for better regulation on vaccines surged. Citizens also wanted more understanding and transparency on vaccine safety.

The US’s Response to the Demand for Better Vaccine Safety

The demand for better vaccine safety resulted in the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act (NCVIA). The NCVIA established several programs and regulations for physicians and government agencies to protect patients and provide education about vaccines and their safety. Programs and regulations established as a result of the NCVIA include:

  • The founding of the National Vaccine Program Office (NVPC). The NVPC coordinates all vaccine-related activities between Department of Human Services (DHS) agencies, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the National Institute of Health (NIH), and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). 
  • The requirement of physicians and healthcare providers who administer vaccines to provide vaccine information statements with each and every vaccine. This requirement is included for multiple doses of vaccines, which means you should receive one of these statements every time you get an immunization, even if it’s a second or third required dose.
  • The requirement of providers and physicians to report any adverse events occurring in patients following inoculation. This is required even if the provider is unsure that the adverse event and the vaccine administration are related. 
  • The establishment of the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, which helps patients and their families after having an adverse reaction or event due to a vaccine. 
  • The formation of a committee within the Institute of Medicine that reviews the literature on vaccine reactions. 

Improvements of Vaccines Through the Years

All vaccines, even the oldest vaccines, continued to be studied for safety and efficacy. These continued studies have resulted in changes and improvements to vaccines over the years. The first major change occurred with the introduction of a new, more purified acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP). The DTaP vaccine replaced the original whole pertussis vaccine for diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. This new version of the vaccine was proven to be more effective in preventing illnesses and had fewer mild and severe side effects. 

Another big change that improved the safety of a vaccine was the changes in when the vaccine is scheduled to be administered. These changes resulted in fewer reported adverse events following inoculation. The first change established a schedule that included sequential administration of an inactivated vaccine and an oral polio vaccine. Later, it was found that the inactivated polio vaccine had better prevention results and fewer side effects. The inactivated polio vaccine is the only type of polio vaccine administered today. 

It’s important to know that all vaccines go through intense research and development phases that include multiple small and large study trials before they are considered for approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). Once vaccines are licensed by the FDA, the ACIP must review and establish recommendations on how to use the vaccine for disease control in the United States. 

Vaccines have saved many lives and prevented many severe illnesses since their inception centuries ago. As you can see, approved vaccines must go through a rigorous process before they are ever considered for the open market. Even vaccines against acute illnesses like the flu and covid-19 must go through this process. 

We hope today’s article helps you understand vaccines and the safety of vaccines better. Vaccines are developed for your protection and we want you to feel safe about getting inoculated yourself or having your children vaccinated. Your Mantachie Rural Healthcare provider is an excellent source of information regarding vaccines. To learn more about vaccines or to schedule yourself or your children for a vaccine, call us at 662-282-4226.

Should You Discuss Your Mental Health Struggles with Your Boss?

Mental health is a hot topic these days and many patients are more open about their mental health struggles than ever before. (Read about why tennis star Naomi Osaka decided to open up about her mental health here.) However, many people still find it difficult to open up about their mental health in their workplace. As understandable as this is, everyone has a right to privacy, but in some circumstances, you may benefit from discussing your mental health struggles with your boss. 

How to Decide if You Should Talk with Your Boss About Your Mental Health

Deciding if you should talk with your boss about your mental health depends on your relationship with them. Do they know you well and are you comfortable discussing private matters with them? Or do you work in a company in which you rarely see your boss and you are sure they don’t know your name? Knowing who you are working for is extremely important.

If your mental health is impacting your job in any way, even if it creates a problem with a co-worker, it may be time to discuss your mental health. If you still don’t feel comfortable, you have some rights as an employee to protect yourself. Ask your mental health provider to complete an FMLA form (Family Medical Leave Act) to protect yourself in case you need to take time off for treatment. Your HR department is obligated to protect your privacy and will not disclose your medical information to anyone, including your boss. If your company has 15 or more employees, you are also protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Preparing to Talk with Your Boss About Your Mental Health

If you’ve decided to talk with your boss, there are a few things you can do to prepare. Making a list of discussion topics to cover can help ease your anxiety and help your thoughts stay organized during your meeting. You should also know your rights as an employee before any discussion begins. Mental health costs employers a whopping $225.8 billion a year. Even if you don’t know your employer well it is still in their best interest, as well as yours, to listen. 

Your mental health provider can also help you prepare for your meeting. They can help you decide what to share with your employer, and they can help you prepare mentally for any anxiety or stress you are feeling about the meeting. 

Is your mental health impacting your job and other areas of your life? Don’t struggle alone. Talk with your mental health provider as soon as possible. The providers at our behavioral health clinic are highly experienced and caring providers who want their patients to succeed. Request an appointment today at 662-282-4226. 

How Diabetes Affects Your Vision Health

Diabetes is a disease of the endocrine system but it can affect just about every other organ and organ system in your body including your eyes. Diabetes can lead to several eye conditions and it is the primary cause of blindness in people with diabetes between the ages of 20 and 74. In today’s article, we’ll take a look at how diabetes affects your vision health and what you can do to lower your risk of developing one of these conditions. 

Why Diabetes Affects Your Vision Health

Diabetes is a metabolic condition affecting the way your body produces insulin. It can lead to hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, and hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Hyperglycemia can lead to a number of vision health problems while hypoglycemia can result in temporary blurry vision. 

Four Eye Conditions Caused by Diabetes

Each of these conditions can affect people with and without diabetes. However, people with diabetes are at a higher risk for these vision problems. 

  • Blurry vision. Hypoglycemia is just one of the ways diabetes can lead to blurry vision. Some patients experience blurry vision when they begin insulin treatment. Long-term blurry vision may be caused by diabetic retinopathy, a group of vision conditions caused by diabetes. 
  • Cataracts. The natural internal lens in the eye works like a camera, allowing your eyes to take images of the world around you. If the lens becomes cloudy, a cataract has formed. In addition to cloudy, blurry vision, older people with diabetes may also experience near-sightedness due to cataracts. 
  • Glaucoma. Your eye needs fluid to function properly. When the eyes don’t get enough fluid, pressure builds up. This condition is known as glaucoma. Glaucoma can damage the nerves and blood vessels leading to changes in vision. The most common form of glaucoma, open-angle glaucoma, can be treated with medication. Open-angle glaucoma may not produce any symptoms until it is further along. Less common glaucoma forms may lead to headaches, blurred vision, eye pain, halos around lights, watery eyes, and even vision loss. 
  • Diabetic retinopathy. High blood sugar caused by diabetes can damage the blood vessels in the eye’s retina. This condition is known as diabetic retinopathy. If left untreated, it can lead to blindness. Other types of retinopathy include:
    • Background retinopathy. This is a “milder” form of diabetic retinopathy in which the blood vessels are damaged but your vision is still okay. 
    • Maculopathy. The macula is the part of the retina that helps you see clearly for reading, driving, and other activities. Diabetes can damage this part of the retina resulting in maculopathy. Swelling from this condition can lead to serious eye problems if left untreated. 
    • Proliferative retinopathy. When the cells at the back of the eye don’t receive enough oxygen, new blood vessels may form. These blood vessels are very fragile and can easily develop blood clots which can cause scarring and pull the retina away from the back of the eye. A detached retina can lead to irreversible vision loss. Some cases of proliferative retinopathy can be treated if caught early.

How You Can Protect Your Vision Health

The best way to protect your eye health is to keep your blood sugar levels in check as often as possible. If you are having trouble with hyperglycemia, it’s time to re-visit your diabetes health provider to discuss changes in insulin treatment. You should also visit your eye doctor regularly for an eye exam and to discuss your diabetes and changes in your vision. 

Another way to protect your vision and other areas of your health affected by diabetes is to educate yourself about your condition. Our website is a great source for diabetes education and we offer a diabetes education class each month at Mantachie Rural Healthcare. To learn more about our diabetes education program or how we can help you manage your diabetes, call 662-282-4226. 

Naomi Osaka’s Battle with Depression

Naomi Osaka is a 23-year-old tennis rock star who has won four major titles and is second in the world of female tennis competitors. She’s also the highest-paid female athlete in the world, bringing in a whopping $55 million in endorsements and prize money in 2020. But she made headlines in June 2021 when she withdrew from competing in the French Open after playing only one match. Her reason for withdrawing from the competition? To focus on Osaka’s battle with depression.

That’s right. You can be one of the top tennis stars in the world and still suffer from mental illness. 

Before the French Open began, Osaka announced that she would not participate in post-match interviews in an effort to safeguard her mental health. Staying true to her word, Osaka skipped out on interviews following her first and only match at the 2021 French Open. This decision drew sharp criticism from reporters and others who felt that she should have participated in interviews like the other athletes. Osaka was also fined $15,000 and received a threat from French Open officials to suspend her from the competition. In turn, Osaka decided to withdraw from the Open. 

Osaka’s Battle with Depression

Osaka told officials that she had been suffering from long bouts of depression since winning the US Open in 2018. Since withdrawing from the French Open, Osaka has also withdrawn from competing in the German and Australian Opens. 

Depression is characterized by sadness and disinterest in doing normal, everyday things. As you can see, it can affect anyone of any age, no matter their talents, popularity, athletic ability, or financial status. 

Despite initial criticism, Osaka has since received praise and support from fans. Many even find her decision to withdraw from these competitions to be inspiring for others who are suffering from a mental health condition. 

It’s important to know that praise and support are not enough to “cure” Osaka’s depression. Although depression patients find more success in treatment when they have the support of family and friends, depression is a real health condition that needs treatment from medical and mental health professionals. 

If you are suffering from depression symptoms, don’t keep fighting alone. Mantachie Rural Healthcare offers behavioral health services by licensed and highly experienced mental health professionals who truly care about their patients and the patient’s success. To schedule an appointment with one of our providers, dial 662-282-4226. 


Our Providers Are Ready to Help You

Request Your Appointment Now