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Healthy Boundaries in Recovery

Healthy Boundaries in Recovery

Boundaries are important in any relationship, but they become especially important when you are in recovery from addiction or other mental health conditions. Today, we’re taking a look at the importance of healthy boundaries in recovery and how to set and enforce them. 

What are Healthy Boundaries?

Boundaries are physical, mental, and emotional limits set to protect yourself and others in a relationship. They help us define who we are while allowing others to be who they are. Boundaries also keep you from being taken advantage of or manipulated. 

Boundaries, like anything else, can be unhealthy. Unhealthy boundaries may include abandoning your personal beliefs or values for acceptance, establishing new relationships without considering how they will affect your recovery, and trusting no one or everyone. Knowing the difference between healthy boundaries and unhealthy boundaries is essential to maintaining your recovery. 

Healthy boundaries basically look like the opposite of unhealthy boundaries. Healthy boundaries include:

  • Carefully evaluating the benefits and drawbacks of each relationship
  • Maintaining your personal beliefs and values regardless of other’s opinions
  • Saying no to gifts, favors, and actions that do not support your recovery
  • Clearly and respectfully expressing what you need or want
  • Developing appropriate trust with others
  • Treating yourself with respect and kindness

Now that you know what healthy boundaries look like it’s time to set the boundaries you need and implement them. Key emphasis on the implementation of these boundaries. Boundaries do no good if you don’t enforce them. Setting and enforcing boundaries looks like this:

  • Establishing a self “bill of rights” such as a right to your own thoughts, emotions, values, and beliefs and right to express how you want to be treated
  • Identifying sobriety risk factors including obvious ones like avoiding a bar if you are an alcoholic and less obvious triggers like watching a football game with friends
  • Setting the boundaries based of your bill of rights and recovery risk factors
  • Enforcing the boundaries and remaining accountable
  • Respecting other people’s boundaries

Need more support in  your addiction recovery? We can help. Call 662-282-4226 to schedule a visit. 

How Vacations Help You Stay Healthy…Plus Ideas for Relaxing Staycations!

Ah,  vacations. Seems like we’re all constantly dreaming of our next getaway. Turns out there’s a good reason for wanting more time off or away. Science says vacations help you stay healthy, even staycations have their benefits! Here’s how:

Vacations relieve stress.

The pressures of everyday life can set off stress hormones including cortisol and epinephrine. Over time, these same hormones can lead to depression, weight gain, poor sleep habits, and other serious health problems. 

Getting away makes you feel happier.

You know how you instantly get in a better mood the minute you hit the road to begin a vacation? That feel-good mood often carries on for weeks after as a post-vacation buzz. The key to staying happy is about how often you get away rather than how long. 

Time off improves your heart health.

Taking time off from work can reduce your risk of coronary artery disease, better known as heart disease. According to WebMD, one study shows that time off for a staycation is linked to lowered blood sugar levels and higher levels of good cholesterol. 

Vacations bring better sleep.

Plan your trip in advance for better sleep before, during, and after your vacation. Take advantage of the break from everyday chores and responsibilities and get in as many naps and late sleep as possible. 

Getaways help you recharge your energy and focus.

Having trouble concentrating at work? It’s time for a vacation. Even a staycation can leave you re-energized and ready to tackle any task coming your way.

Time off strengthens your immune system.

Remember those stress hormones we mentioned earlier? Those hormones can also weaken your immune system, leaving you more susceptible to infections and other illnesses. Taking a break helps keep those hormones in check.

Vacations help you live longer.

From reducing your risk of infections and conditions like heart disease to lowering your stress level, time off or away from the everyday routine can lengthen your lifespan. 

Trips strengthen relationships.

Studies have shown that couples who travel together are happier than those who don’t and are both individually more physically and mentally fit than others. If your relationship with your spouse or another loved one could use room for improvement, try traveling together for the ultimate bonding experience. 

Relaxing Staycations

We get it. There isn’t always room in the budget to save up for a vacation. Good thing there are plenty of staycation ideas that are fun, relaxing, and still offer a break from everyday life. Here are a few of our ideas:

  • Visit your local and state parks. We promise there is a state park within a short driving distance of your hometown. And if it’s still too far, pack a picnic and head to your favorite local park to spend the day basking in the sunlight and feeding ducks. In North Mississippi, try your hand at disc golf at Tombigbee State Park just south of Tupelo or canoe Bear Creek or hike a trail at Tishomingo State Park in Tishomingo County. Camp out at Trace State Park in Belden or hit the highway to Holly Springs for a fun day at Wall Doxey State Park. Wall Doxey and JP Coleman, located at the northeasternmost tip of Mississippi are especially fun for boaters. 
  • Host a backyard campout. Invite a few friends or keep it just the family. Leave the household responsibilities inside, gather your camping gear, and head out back to set up camp. This is possibly the easiest camping trip you’ll ever take because everything you need is already there! You may think your backyard isn’t far away enough but just getting outside improves your mood and your health. 
  • Plan a no-connection day or weekend. Tell your friends and loved ones that you’re cutting ties with all things digital for a day or a weekend if you can swing it. Spend the day reading a book, practicing a hobby, or channeling your creative side. We know you may need to check your phone occasionally for missed calls or texts, but keep those phone checks to a minimum. Simply unplugging for a while can help you recharge and refocus.
  • “Tour” a nearby town. Mississippi and all of the great states that make America have a slew of amazing little towns that are full of surprises. Pick a nearby town on the map and start researching things to do, places to eat and shop, and other fun adventures. New Albany is a great place right here in North Mississippi that offers unique shopping and eating opportunities along with fun outdoor activities like the Tanglefoot Trail. Or you can travel a little closer to Tupelo, North Mississippi’s cultural hub and home of the King of Rock n Roll. Dine on some of the best food in the state, visit the Elvis Presley Museum and Birthplace, and spend some time at Veterans or Ballard Park. 

Signs and Symptoms of ADHD

signs and symptoms of adhd

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD, is a very common yet highly misunderstood mental health disorder in both children and adults. One reason why ADHD is often misunderstood is that the symptoms mimic those of other health conditions such as depression, anxiety, sleep disorders, and certain learning disabilities. Today, we’ll take a look at the signs and symptoms of ADHD.

How ADHD is Diagnosed

ADHD is diagnosed using the guidelines in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fifth Edition, more commonly known as the DSM-5. The main symptoms of ADHD are inattention and hyperactivity. Both symptoms are umbrellas for a series of various symptoms that fall under these categories. 

Symptoms of Inattention

Children are diagnosed with ADHD when they display six or more of the following symptoms, while adults and teens over 17 are diagnosed when five or more symptoms are present. Adults and children with ADHD:

  • Often fail to pay close attention to detail or make careless mistakes in schoolwork or on the job.
  • Often have trouble holding attention to tasks or activities.
  • Often fail to follow directions or finish schoolwork, chores, or other duties.
  • Often don’t listen when spoken to directly.
  • Have trouble organizing tasks or activities.
  • Often avoid, dislike, or are reluctant to perform tasks that require mental effort over a long period of time (schoolwork, homework, work tasks, etc.)
  • Often lose things necessary for tasks.
  • Are often easily distracted or forgetful.

Symptoms of Hyperactivity and Impulsivity

Much like with inattention symptoms, at least six signs of hyperactivity or impulsivity must be present in children and teens under age 16 while at least five symptoms must be displayed in adults. These symptoms should last six months or longer and cause disruption to the patient’s daily life. Children and adults with hyperactivity or impulsivity:

  • Often fidget with or tap their hands and feet and/or squirm in their seat.
  • Often leave their seat in situations where remaining seated is appropriate.
  • Often run about or climb excessively in situations where these behaviors are inappropriate.
  • Often are unable to play or take part in activities due to hyperactivity.
  • Often demonstrate “on the go” acting.
  • Often talk excessively or out of turn.
  • Often blurt out an answer before the question given is complete.
  • Often have trouble waiting their turn.
  • Often interrupt or intrude on others. 

In addition to these symptoms, children must also display several symptoms before reaching age twelve. The symptoms must display in at least two different settings such as school and home and the symptoms must interfere or reduce the quality of school, social, and work functions. Additionally, symptoms displayed should not be attributed to another mental health diagnosis such as schizophrenia. 

If you are concerned that you or your child are suffering from ADHD, Mantachie Rural Health Care can help. Our behavioral health specialists can diagnose and treat ADHD and work right alongside you or your child’s medical provider to provide the best treatment. Click here to request an appointment now

What We Can Learn from Simone Biles’ Mental Health Battles

After a year’s delay due to covid-19, the Olympics finally returned in Tokyo on July 23, 2021. One of the first and most anticipated events to be televised was the women’s gymnastics team final. Sports fans across America and other parts of the globe gathered around the television to watch the young female competitors of Team USA. 

One gymnast, in particular, was at the top of everyone’s conversation. Simone Biles is a four-time Olympic gold medal winner and World Champion. Some consider her to be one of gymnastics’ greatest of all time. Fans waited with baited anticipation for Biles to take her turn in the team competition. But when Biles began her vault routine, it was clear that something was amiss with the world’s most decorated active gymnast. 

During her vault routine, Simone Biles began experiencing the “twisties,” a very real condition affecting gymnasts. The twisties is a loss of air awareness that can result in catastrophe for the gymnast. It was this event that led to Biles’ decision to pull out of the rest of the team competition’s events. 

Biles’ decision stunned everyone from her teammates to sports announcers to the fans watching from home. Her choice stirred up even more controversy when she shared the reason behind her difficult decision. Biles decided to withdraw to “do what’s right for me and focus on my mental health.”

Biles’ initial statement didn’t give much away about what exactly happened, but she later took to Instagram to share more details. “Honestly petrifying trying to do a skill but not having your mind and body in sync. 10/10 do not recommend.” Along with her statement, Biles shared a video from practice that was later removed, in which she was clearly struggling on events she normally mastered. 

What We Can Learn from Simone’s Mental Health Struggles

In a later interview, Biles was asked what was the biggest misconception about her mental health. She responded, “That I was at no risk, and that mental health isn’t a serious issue.”

Perhaps it’s hard to believe that one of the greatest athletes of all time could possibly be struggling with mental health issues. But Biles experienced deep trauma as a sexual abuse victim of former Olympic physician, Dr. Larry Nassar, and has shared that she was depressed during the 2016 Olympics. 

Biles has clearly learned how important it is to take your mental health seriously. She made no commitments to compete in any further competitions at the Olympics until she felt stronger mentally. On Tuesday, August 3, 2021, Biles returned to the competition to compete in the balance beam event, an event for which she won a bronze medal.

Biles was initially unsure if she would return to the Tokyo games and made no apologies for putting her mental health first, despite the criticism she received from some commentators and fans. She understood that until she was able to improve herself mentally, she was no good to her team. 

Pressing the pause button to focus on her mental help was probably one of the best decisions Biles could have made. Burnout, depression, and anxiety are as real as any other mental health condition. 

If you are struggling to keep your head above water, and it’s affecting your normal day-to-day life, it is time to focus on your mental health. This may mean taking a temporary break from work or other life responsibilities to get well. You may receive criticism like Biles, but those who truly care and know you well should show support. 

Mantachie Rural Health Care offers behavioral health counseling and other services to help our patients get back on track. If you are struggling with mental health issues, don’t keep suffering alone. Click here to request your appointment with one of our mental health specialists. 

The Truth About Drug Addiction Overdose and Recovery

September is National Recovery Month. It’s a time to bring awareness to the importance of recovery from a drug or alcohol addiction or a mental health trauma. 

Why Addiction Recovery and Overdose Awareness is Important for Everyone

Since 1999, nearly 841,000 people have died from a drug overdose. In 2019 alone, over 70,500 overdose deaths occurred in the United States. That number continues to increase each year and our country hasn’t experienced a significant decrease in overdose deaths in many years.

If these numbers aren’t reason enough to care about drug addiction overdoses and recovery, perhaps understanding that drug addiction can affect any person from any walk of life will get your attention. That’s right, you and your family members are not exempt from experiencing drug or alcohol addiction no matter how good of a lifestyle you try to live. It can and does happen to all types of people.

Drug overdoses are a leading cause of injury death in the US among people ages 25 to 64. Adults aren’t the only ones at risk, however. More than 4,770 teens also died from a drug overdose in 2019. Nearly 3,320 teenage boys passed away from a drug overdose that year while just under 1,500 teen girls also died from the same cause. The overwhelming majority of these deaths were caused by opioids. 

What You Need to Know About Opioids and Overdoses

Opioids, especially synthetic opioids, are the number one cause of overdose deaths in the United States. Synthetic opioids, excluding methadone, accounted for nearly 73% of opioid-related overdose deaths in 2019. In total, opioids were involved in nearly 50,000 overdose deaths that same year. 

Overdoses typically occur within 1-3 hours of using the drug and despite what many falsely believe, an overdose can happen the very first time you use a substance like opioids or amphetamines. Mixing opiate drugs with other depressants like alcohol or benzodiazepines greatly increases the risk of an overdose death as does combining them with a psychostimulant like methamphetamine. Using pure heroin after regularly using heroin that has been “cut” with another substance like sugar can also lead to an overdose.

The Truth About Recovery and Overdosing

Relapsing after spending time not using your drug of choice also increases your risk of overdose death. That’s why support during recovery from drug addiction or alcoholism is so important to success. Addicts are more likely to relapse if they feel they lack a support system or are still receiving criticism for their past choices from those who should be lending their support. 

Addicts are considered in remission from substance addiction five years after addiction recovery begins. If you relapse and survive, don’t let your recurrence be a reason to wallow in your addiction. Recurrence is normal for most addicts but doesn’t mean they aren’t capable of staying sober. It can take time for an addict to adjust to their new life post-addiction. The important thing to remember is not to give up hope no matter if you are an addict or a loved one of an addict.

Like with other health conditions, early intervention can lead to earlier remission from addiction. If you or someone you love has recently started a new drug addiction, there is still time to get on the path to a faster recovery. 

You should know that there is no one perfect path to recovery. Many addicts find pharmacological, social, and psychological treatments to be helpful while some are able to recover without formal help. Any of these options are acceptable as long as they truly lead to remission. 

Addiction treatment and counseling is one of several behavioral health services we offer at Mantachie Rural Health Care. For more information or to make an appointment, click here.

Should You Discuss Your Mental Health Struggles with Your Boss?

Mental health is a hot topic these days and many patients are more open about their mental health struggles than ever before. (Read about why tennis star Naomi Osaka decided to open up about her mental health here.) However, many people still find it difficult to open up about their mental health in their workplace. As understandable as this is, everyone has a right to privacy, but in some circumstances, you may benefit from discussing your mental health struggles with your boss. 

How to Decide if You Should Talk with Your Boss About Your Mental Health

Deciding if you should talk with your boss about your mental health depends on your relationship with them. Do they know you well and are you comfortable discussing private matters with them? Or do you work in a company in which you rarely see your boss and you are sure they don’t know your name? Knowing who you are working for is extremely important.

If your mental health is impacting your job in any way, even if it creates a problem with a co-worker, it may be time to discuss your mental health. If you still don’t feel comfortable, you have some rights as an employee to protect yourself. Ask your mental health provider to complete an FMLA form (Family Medical Leave Act) to protect yourself in case you need to take time off for treatment. Your HR department is obligated to protect your privacy and will not disclose your medical information to anyone, including your boss. If your company has 15 or more employees, you are also protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Preparing to Talk with Your Boss About Your Mental Health

If you’ve decided to talk with your boss, there are a few things you can do to prepare. Making a list of discussion topics to cover can help ease your anxiety and help your thoughts stay organized during your meeting. You should also know your rights as an employee before any discussion begins. Mental health costs employers a whopping $225.8 billion a year. Even if you don’t know your employer well it is still in their best interest, as well as yours, to listen. 

Your mental health provider can also help you prepare for your meeting. They can help you decide what to share with your employer, and they can help you prepare mentally for any anxiety or stress you are feeling about the meeting. 

Is your mental health impacting your job and other areas of your life? Don’t struggle alone. Talk with your mental health provider as soon as possible. The providers at our behavioral health clinic are highly experienced and caring providers who want their patients to succeed. Request an appointment today at 662-282-4226. 

Naomi Osaka’s Battle with Depression

Naomi Osaka is a 23-year-old tennis rock star who has won four major titles and is second in the world of female tennis competitors. She’s also the highest-paid female athlete in the world, bringing in a whopping $55 million in endorsements and prize money in 2020. But she made headlines in June 2021 when she withdrew from competing in the French Open after playing only one match. Her reason for withdrawing from the competition? To focus on Osaka’s battle with depression.

That’s right. You can be one of the top tennis stars in the world and still suffer from mental illness. 

Before the French Open began, Osaka announced that she would not participate in post-match interviews in an effort to safeguard her mental health. Staying true to her word, Osaka skipped out on interviews following her first and only match at the 2021 French Open. This decision drew sharp criticism from reporters and others who felt that she should have participated in interviews like the other athletes. Osaka was also fined $15,000 and received a threat from French Open officials to suspend her from the competition. In turn, Osaka decided to withdraw from the Open. 

Osaka’s Battle with Depression

Osaka told officials that she had been suffering from long bouts of depression since winning the US Open in 2018. Since withdrawing from the French Open, Osaka has also withdrawn from competing in the German and Australian Opens. 

Depression is characterized by sadness and disinterest in doing normal, everyday things. As you can see, it can affect anyone of any age, no matter their talents, popularity, athletic ability, or financial status. 

Despite initial criticism, Osaka has since received praise and support from fans. Many even find her decision to withdraw from these competitions to be inspiring for others who are suffering from a mental health condition. 

It’s important to know that praise and support are not enough to “cure” Osaka’s depression. Although depression patients find more success in treatment when they have the support of family and friends, depression is a real health condition that needs treatment from medical and mental health professionals. 

If you are suffering from depression symptoms, don’t keep fighting alone. Mantachie Rural Healthcare offers behavioral health services by licensed and highly experienced mental health professionals who truly care about their patients and the patient’s success. To schedule an appointment with one of our providers, dial 662-282-4226. 

What is PTSD? Know the Signs and Symptoms

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder caused by trauma. The trauma can be mental or physical or both. It can happen to anyone but is common among soldiers and victims of violence or emotional abuse. Illnesses can also cause PTSD.

Signs and Symptoms 

If you’ve experienced trauma, watch for these signs. PTSD can occur immediately after the event or years later. The types of symptoms include intrusive memories, avoidance, negative changes in mood and changes in physical and emotional reaction. 

Intrusive memories

  • Recurring, unwanted memories of the event.
  • Reliving the event in flashbacks.
  • Upsetting nightmares.
  • Severe emotional distress or reaction to something that reminds you of the event. 

Avoidance

  • Avoiding thinking about it or talking about it.
  • Avoiding people, places, or activities that remind you of the trauma. 

Negative changes in mood

  • Negative thoughts about yourself and others or the world
  • Hopelessness
  • Memory trouble
  • Trouble maintaining relationships
  • Feeling detached from others
  • Lack of interest in activities you once enjoyed. 
  • Feeling emotionally numb

Changes in Reactions

  • Always on guard
  • Easily startled
  • Self-destruction like using drugs or alcohol
  • Difficulty concentrating and sleeping
  • Guilt or shame
  • Outbursts

In children 6 years or younger

  • Reenacting events in play
  • Terrifying nightmares

The feelings can be intense and you should seek outside help to learn to cope and move on. Mantachie Rural Healthcare offers behavioral health services including counseling for PTSD. Don’t suffer alone, get help now. Click here to schedule an appointment

Meet Our New Behavioral Health Provider Elizabeth Duncan, PMHNP

Elizabth Duncan, PMHNP,  has always had a desire to help people. It’s no wonder that she’s put that desire to work for 46 years as a nurse. She’s spent 28 of those years as a family nurse practitioner and 14 years as a psychiatric nurse practitioner. 

“I love helping people. It’s not a job, it’s something I enjoy. I can help them get well if they want to get well,” said Duncan.

Duncan moved to Batesville in 2005 where she worked with Region 4 Mental Health before moving to Itawamba County to help care for her mother-in-law who suffers from Alzheimer’s disease. Duncan worked for Right Track in 2020 before joining the Mantachie Rural Healthcare staff in 2021. 

Much of Duncan’s psychiatric work consists of treating patients with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, PTSD, sleep issues, and school and life issues. Duncan says patients often come in with challenges that have made them cautious about getting treatment. Those challenges include failure with other providers. Duncan encourages her patients to try one more time if they were unhappy with their first appointment. 

“I’ve never seen anyone I couldn’t help, if they wanted to be helped,” she said. 

Duncan says another big challenge for both patient and provider is trust. Patients often face difficulty trusting their provider with their private and personal problems. For Duncan and other professionals in her field, the challenge is getting the patient to open up and be real about the issues they are facing. 

Duncan wants her current and future patients to know that she is available and here to help. She wants to help her patients have better functioning lives and to know that she truly cares about them and getting them the help they need.

When asked about her most memorable experience as a psychiatric nurse practitioner, Duncan said that moment happened on her last day working in Corinth. She had been caring for a patient who was going to be placed on disability. The patient had both physical and psychiatric health issues. 

He told Duncan, “I might as well not have been alive. You were my last hope.” 

That patient is now working as a manager a large plant. 

When she’s not treating patients, Duncan, who grew up on a farm, enjoys gardening in her raised beds and when time allows, fishing. 

As you can see, Elizabeth Duncan is a caring provider who will go the extra mile to help her patients get better and live a full life. To schedule an appointment with Duncan, dial 662-262-4226 or click here.

What You Need to Know About Children’s Mental Health

Children’s mental health affects all aspects of their lives including their physical health, school success, and success at work and in society. However, out of the estimated 15 million children who could be diagnosed with a mental disorder, only 7 percent will receive the professional services they need. One way to increase this number and get more children the appropriate care is through education about children’s mental health disorders. 

Factors Affecting Children’s Mental Health

Several risk factors can affect a child’s mental health. Some children are born with genetic and biological factors which increase their risks for mental health disorders. Environmental factors like a child’s home life and where they live can also put them at a greater risk. Relationships with family members, teachers, fellow classmates, and other important people in a child’s life affects their mental health as well. 

Most Common Types of Children’s Mental Health Disorders

Understanding the signs and symptoms of mental health disorders affecting children helps parents to get their child the help they need. The following conditions are the most common children’s mental health disorders diagnosed today. 

  • Anxiety
    • Signs of anxiety include being afraid when away from parents and extreme fear of specific situations.
    • Social anxiety in school and fear of the future or of bad things happening are also common symptoms. 
    • Children with anxiety may suffer from repeated panic disorder episodes with symptoms including but not limited to sudden, unexpected, extreme fear, trouble breathing, pounding heart, and/or dizziness, shakiness, or sweating. 
  • Depression
    • Symptoms include feeling sad, hopeless, or irritable. Other signs are:
    • Changes in sleeping or eating habits.
    • Changes in energy, from being tired or sluggish to tense or restless.
    • Inability to focus or concentrate.
    • Feeling worthless, useless, or guilty.
    • Infliction of self-injury or self-destruction.
  • ADHD
    • Signs of ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) such as a lack of focus and forgetting things easily are also accompanied by other symptoms such as:
    • Being prone to daydreaming often.
    • Impulsiveness
    • Fidgeting and/or talking too much
    • Trouble getting along with others
    • Making careless mistakes
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
    • OCD consists of having unwanted thoughts, images, or impulses that occur over and over again causing stress or anxiety. 
    • Other obvious signs include having to think or do something over and over again or perform a ritual following certain rules to stop obsessive thoughts. 
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder
    • Children who act out so seriously that their behavior causes problems at home, school, or with peers may be diagnosed with ODD.
    • Behaviors of ODD include often being angry or easily losing one’s temper, arguing with adults or refusing to comply with rules set by authority figures, and being resentful or spiteful.
    • Children with ODD may also be easily annoyed by others or attempt to annoy others themselves, and they may also blame others for their mistakes or misbehaviors. 
  • Conduct Disorder
    • Conduct disorder occurs when a child persistently shows a pattern of aggression towards others and violates rules and social norms at home, school, and among peers.
    • Children with conduct disorder may display behaviors such as running away from home, staying out past curfew, skipping school, lying, causing damage to other people’s property, and being aggressive toward others. 
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
    • Some children recover quickly from trauma while others suffer long-term effects with a condition known as PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder.
    • Signs of PTSD include reliving the traumatic event over and over again, having nightmares or difficulty sleeping, and becoming upset over memories of the event.
    • Other symptoms may also occur such as intense, ongoing sadness, irritability, angry outbursts, and being easily startled. 
    • Children with PTSD may also become withdrawn or lack positive emotions. 

If you believe your child is suffering from a mental health disorder Mantachie Rural Healthcare can help. Dial 662-282-4226 to request an appointment with our behavior health specialist. 


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