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Foods That Help You Focus

Brain food. We’ve all heard the phrase. But is brain food a real thing? Can you improve your brain’s overall ability to think, focus, and recall memory with your diet? The short answer is yes, you can! Turns out a number of foods and beverages can improve your brain health and provide other health benefits as well. 

Caffeine and Glucose Offer Brain Power in Limited Moderation

Believe it or not, caffeine and sugar glucose–not table sugar, but naturally occurring sugars like those found in fruits and vegetables–are brain-powering foods as long as you have them in limited moderation. A cup of coffee helps you be more alert while a glass of orange juice or other fruit juice offers a quick brain boost. Limiting the amount of caffeine and sugar is essential–too much of either can impair your memory and concentration. 

Breakfast is Key

Many studies have proven that people who eat a healthy breakfast perform better overall than those who don’t eat breakfast. A good, brain-powering breakfast consists of high fiber whole grains, dairy, and fruit. Healthy proteins are also encouraged but don’t think any breakfast will do. Dining on high-calorie breakfast meals can actually hinder your concentration. 

Fish = Good for Your Heart and Mind

Fish is a superfood for good reason. The poultry of the sea is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, nutrients that are vital to both your brain and heart health. In fact, eating two servings of fish a week can lower your risk of dementia and stroke, and other age-related conditions. 

Nuts, Seeds, and Dark Chocolate for Brain-Healthy Snacks

Need a quick pick-me-up for the afternoon lag? Reach for a handful of nuts or an ounce of dark chocolate. Nuts and seeds are rich in vitamin E while dark chocolate is full of brain-enhancing antioxidants. Like caffeine and natural sugar, eat these foods in strict moderation. Just one ounce of each of these foods per day is all you need to improve your brain health.

Don’t Forget the Whole Grains and Avocado

If guacamole is a lunchtime favorite, you’re in luck. Fruits like avocados improve blood flow, which improves all other functions in your body including the brain. Along with whole grains, avocados lower your risk of heart disease and decrease bad cholesterol as well, making them both superfoods you should include in your regular or daily diet. 

Brain-Protecting Blueberries

Need another superfruit to add to your diet? Blueberries may just be the most super of all the superfoods. This tiny round fruit may protect the brain from damage from free radicals–the kind of damage that leads to dementia and other age-related conditions. Blueberries may also reduce the effects of Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and similar diseases. 

Bagel Up for a Big Day

Lox and bagel sandwiches may not be a thing here in the South but head anywhere north of the Mason-Dixon line and you’ll find this breakfast meal in every bakery or restaurant that sells a bagel. A “lox” is a brined salmon fillet. As it happens, experts recommend preparing for a big day by eating a whole-grain bagel with salmon for breakfast and washing it down with a glass of juice and cup of coffee for maximum brain power. Perhaps it’s time to add lox and bagel sandwiches to a Southern menu near you!

As always, consult with your provider or dietitian before beginning a new diet. Want to get a better check on your brain health? The new year is a great time to schedule your annual wellness visit. Click here to request an appointment now. 

The Long-Term Effects of Covid-19

Most survivors of Covid-19 recover in a few weeks. An estimated 30% of patients, however, continue to experience side effects from Covid-19 long after the acute illness is gone. Even those with mild cases of the disease are susceptible to long-term effects, although older people and those with serious medical conditions are most likely to suffer extended symptoms. People with long-lasting effects of Covid-19 may refer to themselves as “long-haulers” or refer to their symptoms as “long covid”.

Common Long-Term Symptoms

The most common long-term symptoms of covid are fatigue, shortness of breath, cough, and joint or chest pain. Other less common symptoms reported by patients include:

  • Muscle pain or headache
  • Pounding or fast heartbeat
  • Problems with memory, concentration, and sleep
  • Loss of smell or taste
  • Skin rash or hair loss

Other Long-Term Symptoms

In addition to these symptoms, Covid-19 can cause lasting damage to the lungs, heart, or brain. The virus can cause significant damage to the heart muscle resulting in an increased risk of heart failure or complications. Pneumonia associated with this virus can also damage the alveoli, tiny air sacs in the lungs that help us breathe, leading to breathing problems. Covid has also led to the development of strokes, seizures, and Guillain-Barre syndrome, a condition causing temporary paralysis. These serious conditions can even affect young people with the virus. 

Blood clots are another serious long-term complication of Covid-19. Experts believe small blood clots are the likely culprit of covid-related heart problems while large blood clots can damage the lungs, legs, liver, and kidneys. Covid-19 is also linked to weakened blood vessels that leak and develop problems for the liver and kidneys. 

Covid-19 is also linked to problems with mood and fatigue, including the development of chronic fatigue syndrome. Chronic fatigue syndrome is a condition in which fatigue symptoms worsen with physical activity or exercise and are not relieved with rest. Some patients also report depression and other mood problems following a bout of covid.

Although all these symptoms are serious, the World Health Organization (WHO) says patients experiencing long-covid are not contagious. 

As you can see, Covid-19 can lead to significant and even deadly long-term effects, and anyone can become susceptible to these lingering immune responses. The best ways to ensure you and your loved ones don’t suffer from the effects of covid is to continue practicing social distancing, wash or sanitize hands often, and wear a mask in public places. And now that a vaccine is available, we encourage you and your family to get immunized as soon as the vaccine is available to your age group. 

If you are experiencing symptoms related to Covid-19, contact your Mantachie Rural Health Care provider immediately to schedule an appointment and self-quarantine until your visit. If you are in need of an appointment, click here to contact us now. 

Foods That Cleanse the Arteries

What you eat matters, especially when it comes to your body’s potential for a heart attack. Red meat is notoriously linked to clogged arteries or atherosclerosis. Unhealthy fats like saturated fat and trans fat as well as sugar are also linked to an increase for a heart attack. 

But what about foods that lower your risk of a heart attack? Do they exist? We’ve got great news. Yes! You can cleanse your arteries and improve your heart health by changing your diet to include heart-healthy superfoods. 

You Can’t Go Wrong with Mediterranean

There’s a reason why the Mediterranean diet is popular with all health experts and has outlived the plethora of fad diets that have emerged over the years. The Mediterranean diet is actually good for everyone, even those on special diets because the recommended foods are practically the healthiest Earth has to offer. The diet is centered around plant-based foods including fruits, veggies, herbs, nuts, beans, and whole grains. Seafood, dairy, poultry, and eggs are added in moderation. Unhealthy fats and sugar are avoided although red meat is allowed on a limited occasion. 

Eat the Rainbow

Skittles tells us to taste the rainbow, but we encourage you to eat the whole rainbow when it comes to fruits and vegetables. A heart-healthy plate consists largely of fruits and veggies in a rainbow of colors with limitations to starchy vegetables like potatoes and sweet potatoes. 

Go Nuts

Nuts are the perfect healthy snack to get you through the afternoon slowdown. They’ll give you a boost of energy, and they’re good for your heart, too. Just don’t go too crazy. An ounce of nuts a day is all you need. 

Fishing for Clean Arteries

Fatty fish like tuna, salmon, mackerel, and herring are perfect when you want a taste of meat on your plate. You can enjoy two servings of fish a week. 

Beans and Legumes

Beans, lentils, and peas are an essential part of a heart-healthy diet. They contain proteins, vitamins, and minerals, which is why they are a great alternative to meat for vegans and vegetarians. 

Don’t Forget the Olive Oil

Extra virgin olive oil is the go-to cooking oil and salad dressing for those following a heart-healthy diet. Toss out the ranch dressing and vegetable oil and pick up this versatile food instead. 

Whole Grains

Grains should be consumed in their whole, unprocessed form, according to health and nutrition experts. Whole grains have more fiber than processed grains, and they can also help balance blood glucose levels. 

A heart-healthy diet works best in conjunction with a heart-healthy lifestyle which includes daily exercise or activity and refraining from unhealthy habits like smoking. As always, consult with your provider before beginning a new diet. 

Annual wellness visits also lower your risk of a heart attack by giving your provider a chance to perform key tests that detect silent signs of a heart problem. To request your annual exam, click here. 

Can the Flu Increase Your Chances of Heart Attack or Stroke?

Does the flu impact your risk of a heart attack or stroke? That’s the question researchers sought to answer in a recent study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Heart attacks and strokes increase during the winter months, which also coincides with flu season. Researchers suspected a link between the viral illness and the two deadly conditions. The results of their study confirmed their suspicions.

The flu increases the risk of both a heart attack and a stroke, though the timeline in which the conditions typically occur differ. Heart attacks are more likely to occur within the first 7-14 days of onset of acute flu illness while a stroke can still occur up to 30 days following the illness. The study did not share if participants had the flu vaccine. However, other research in the study found that incidences of heart attacks and strokes following the flu were lower in years in which the vaccine’s success rate was higher. 

What You Can Do to Lower Your Risk

The study did not reveal exactly what causes the increased risk for stroke or heart attack. It’s safe to assume that if you are already at a higher risk for either condition, you need to take caution. The first step you can take is to get this year’s flu vaccine if you haven’t already. Although the flu vaccine doesn’t always prevent the virus it can shorten illness time and decrease the severity of sickness. 

If you do develop flu-like illness, seek a proper diagnosis and treatment from your provider as soon as possible. If you get sick when your provider is unavailable, visit an urgent care to get immediate treatment then schedule a follow-up with your regular provider as soon as possible. Keep all of your appointments with your provider during your illness and take note of any new symptoms, particularly those that occur before a heart attack or stroke. If you begin to notice these symptoms, seek medical attention immediately. Do not wait to get help. 

You can also prevent the flu and a subsequent heart attack or stroke by continuing to follow the social distancing guidelines in place for coronavirus. The possibility of developing both the flu and coronavirus at the same time is real and only increases your risk of serious illness or even death. We encourage those at a higher risk to continue to stay home until after the flu season. 

Many signs pointing to an increased risk for heart attack or stroke are silent and can only be detected by a provider. Your annual wellness visit is the best time for your Mantachie Rural Health Care provider to determine your risks and develop an action plan. Click here to request your annual exam today. 

ADHD During a Pandemic: How to Help Your Child Stay on Task

ADHD During a Pandemic: How to Help Your Child Stay on Task

ADHD, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, is more common than ever among schoolchildren. Children with ADHD are easily distracted, impulsive, often fidget, and struggle to pay attention or focus on the task at hand, such as listening to a class lesson or completing an assignment. Over the last few decades, great strides have been taken to help children with ADHD improve their symptoms and perform better in the classroom. However, the recent pandemic has seen an upswing in children who are again struggling to keep up with school work. 

What causes ADHD?

ADHD is a result of less activity in the part of the brain that controls attention or imbalances in brain chemicals known as neurotransmitters. Children with ADHD are either predominantly hyperactive/impulsive or predominantly inattentive. Predominantly hyperactive/impulsive children display more fidgety or disruptive behaviors while predominantly inattentive children simply struggle to focus attention. 

ADHD Treatments

Providers treat ADHD by two different methods–medication and therapy. The most successful treatment of ADHD combines both medicine and therapy. Stimulant medications are the most commonly prescribed and best medicinal treatment for ADHD. Certain non-stimulant medicines are also sometimes used but are believed to carry a higher risk for the patient. Talk therapy and support therapies such as social skills therapy can help children with ADHD learn how to cope with struggles. It may also boost their self-esteem, as well as teach them how to get along well socially. 

The role of the parent or guardian is as crucial in the treatment of ADHD as therapy and medication. Parents or guardians can help their ADHD child stay on task with the implementation of a daily written schedule or routine. This schedule should include all tasks to be completed from the time they wake up to bedtime. Tasks include basic daily activities such as eating breakfast, brushing teeth and hair, and getting dressed, as well as any home tasks such as chores or homework. 

Parents are also their children’s biggest advocate at school. They should ensure the school treats their child’s ADHD virtually through special education and modifications to help the child stay on task. IEPs and 504s should be in place for any student with ADHD.

ADHD and Coronavirus Pandemic

ADHD doesn’t place your child at a greater risk for contracting coronavirus. However, the pandemic could still affect their condition. Behavioral health experts have seen a rise in ADHD children who are struggling to keep up with schoolwork due to distance learning and other hurdles caused by the pandemic. Luckily, parents and children can implement a number of measures to help ease ADHD struggles.

  • Create a new daily schedule/clear routine for distance learning. Work with your child’s teacher or teachers to create the best schedule to manage their ADHD during the pandemic. Ensure the schedule includes breaks that detail activities for the child to do to unwind. 
  • Make sure teachers continue to implement learning modifications and adjusted them to fit distance learning. 
  • Create one space for everything. Students are using a plethora of learning and streaming programs for distance learning. A child with ADHD may become overwhelmed by the various links and programs they must access each day. They may benefit from consolidating links and schedules all in one place. Consider using a Google Document since Google Classroom is a commonly used program among schools. Parents should work with the child’s teacher to create this designated starting place.
  • Develop daily/weekly checklists and scheduled check-ins. Again, parents and teachers should work together to create daily and weekly checklists to help children with ADHD stay on top of school tasks and assignments. Ask to schedule regular check-ins between the child and their teachers to give them opportunities to address problems or questions.
  • Ask for non-screen work. It’s no secret that too much screen time is detrimental especially to children who are already struggling with attention or learning disabilities. Parents should talk with their child’s school or teachers to find out if paper assignments are available to complete and return to the school to help reduce screen time. 
  • Use tools like text-to-speech to help children stay on task. ADDitude Magazine offers a great list of assistive technology apps and extensions to help students struggling with schoolwork.

Has your child been struggling with ADHD-like behaviors for longer than six months? It could be more than just struggles of learning during a pandemic that are causing your child to have problems. At Mantachie Rural Healthcare, we diagnose and treat ADHD with combined work between your child’s healthcare provider and our behavioral health specialists. Don’t let your child struggle through another semester when help is just a call away. Request an evaluation appointment today at 662-282-4226 or through our website.

Teens Active in Extracurriculars Have Stronger Mental Health

Teens Active in Extracurriculars Have Stronger Mental Health

Teens who participate in extracurricular activities tend to have better mental health than those who do not, according to a recent study published in the journal Preventive Medicine. The study, conducted among more than 28,000 seventh grade students across 365 schools in British Columbia, found that those who played sports or participated in the arts had fewer mental health issues than students who spent their free time behind a screen. 

This should come as no surprise. Physical activity and practicing a hobby or art are known to boost teens’ mental health. But in a pandemic year when many activities have been greatly altered or sidelined altogether, teens must get more creative and independent with keeping themselves busy and off the screens. 

How to Maintain Extracurricular Activities During the Pandemic

Many sports and activities have managed to continue in some capacity this year while others haven’t fared as well. Whether your child is participating in an extracurricular that is active this year or holding out for next year, it’s important to keep them on track and in practice for their chosen outlet. 

Encourage them in any way you can. Be a listening ear when they are practicing their music scales or volunteer to play the catcher when they want to practice their curveball. If your budget allows, spring for socially distanced lessons to help them improve their chosen sport or art. If not, check out the many free resources online including YouTube. Yes, we know this means putting your teen behind a screen. However, this counts as productive screen time and you can monitor their progress and lessons to ensure they’re not getting distracted. 

Limited Screen Time is Key to Teens Mental Health

The British Columbian study found that boys and girls overall fared far better mentally with less than two hours of screen time in addition to participating in extracurriculars. Even if your child can’t attend a band practice or art lesson, you can still limit their screen time. And you can encourage other productive activities like reading or learning a life skill. 

We know that limiting screen time during a pandemic is harder than usual. But we and other medical experts believe that making this sacrifice will ultimately reward you and your children in the long run. If your teen is struggling to stay strong mentally, we can help. Mantachie students can begin seeking help at our school-based clinic and continue treatment at our main clinic. Dial 662-282-4226 or request an appointment online to learn more. 

Everything You Need to Know About a Plant-Based Diet

Everything You Need to Know About a Plant-Based Diet

The plant-based diet is a buzzphrase heard more and more in healthcare clinics and even in everyday conversations among friends. But what exactly is the eating strategy behind the buzzphrase? And why do more experts than ever insist that a plant-based diet is the way to go for optimum health?

The Truth About Plant-Based Diets

Despite some beliefs, the term plant-based diet is not another term for a vegetarian or vegan diet. Rather, plant-based diets are focused on eating more foods from plants than other food sources such as meat and poultry. Plant-based diets also avoid processed foods and refined sugars. People who follow this plan might be flexitarian, or semi-vegetarian, in which they mostly consume food from plants, as well as eggs, dairy, and the occasional meat, poultry, fish, or seafood. Pescatarian diets are similar to flexitarian without the consumption of meat or poultry. Vegetarians include egg and dairy products in their diet while vegans consume no animal products at all. 

Another myth about plant-based diets is that people on these diets are often tired and don’t get enough fats and proteins. A well-rounded plant-based diet includes plenty of healthy fats and proteins through certain plant-based oils, nuts, seeds, legumes, and beans. 

Why Plant-Based Diets Are Good for Your Health

Plant-based diets have been rising in popularity over the last several decades for a number of reasons. The long-standing and still highly recommended Mediterranean diet is a plant-based flexitarian diet. It also includes fish, eggs, yogurt, and cheese a few times per week with meat and poultry less often. This diet has been linked to a decreased risk of heart disease, diabetes, metabolic syndromes, and depression. It’s also been known to reduce the risk of certain cancers including breast, colon, and prostate cancers. Older adults who follow the Mediterranean diet also enjoy a lower risk of frailty and better mental and physical health. 

You don’t have to follow the Mediterranean diet to get health benefits. Any diet that focuses on whole foods from plants and other natural food sources is better for your overall health and wellness than a diet based on processed and refined foods. Plant-based diets have also been linked to needed weight loss. This also lowers the risk of certain conditions like diabetes and heart disease. 

How to Start Following a Plant-Based Diet

Beginning a plant-based diet is actually easier than it sounds. The first step is to add more fruits and veggies to your shopping list and incorporate servings into each meal or snack of the day. You’ll also want to include other plant-based foods like good fats such as olive oil, olives, nuts, nut butter, seeds, and avocados. The next step is to increase the number of fruits and veggies on your plate while reducing the amount of meat to a garnish rather than the main course. Make sure you’re including at least one good portion of greens on your plate each day. Try to mix it up among different greens like spinach, kale, or collards. Keep your diet fresh by changing up how you cook your veggies for each meal. 

Experts also recommend consuming at least one all-vegetarian meal per week that includes whole grains, beans, and veggies. You should also build at least one meal a week around a salad and consume whole grains for breakfast each day. Yummy whole-grain breakfast options include oatmeal, quinoa, buckwheat, and barley, which can be paired with fruit, cinnamon, and other plant-based flavors. 

Although a plant-based diet is considered to be good for just about everyone, it’s always best to discuss any new diet changes with your healthcare provider or dietitian first. We can discuss your diet concerns and proposed changes at your next wellness appointment with Mantachie Rural Healthcare. Call 662-282-4226 or click here to request your wellness visit now. 

Who Will Be the First to Receive the Covid-19 Vaccine?

Who Will Be the First to Receive the Covid-19 Vaccine?

As this is being written, the first round of British citizens has received a new COVID-19 vaccine by the Pfizer company. If approved by the Food and Drug Administration, the same vaccine could be shipped to the U.S. by mid-December 2020. Another vaccine by the Moderna company is also in line for approval. If all works out, both vaccines will be in use by January. The question is, who gets the first round of vaccines in the United States?

Two elderly people were the first to receive the vaccine in the UK (Britain). The US, however, plans to take a slightly different path with the first rollout of immunizations. Instead, US healthcare workers, who are considered at the highest risk for contracting covid-19, will receive the first round of vaccines along with residents of nursing homes and long-term healthcare facilities. Residents of these facilities have so far accounted for 39% of deaths caused by Covid-19 in the US. 

What We Know About the COVID-19 Vaccines So Far

At this time, both Pfizer and Moderna have vaccines at the ready to be distributed upon authorization by the FDA. When approved, the first doses will be shipped out within 24 hours. Both vaccines will require a second dosage. Pfizer’s vaccine requires a boost three weeks after the first dose. Similarly those who receive the Moderna vaccine will need a second dose after four weeks. 

Who will Decide Who Gets the COVID-19 Vaccine First?

Choosing which healthcare workers will be the first to receive the COVID-19 vaccine is a decision that will be left up to each state. Right now, each state has a designated group of experts deciding who is at the highest risk. Some states may elect to vaccinate critical care nurses and physicians along with respiratory therapists and other workers who risk the most exposure to the virus. Others could decide to vaccinate their oldest healthcare workers first along with those working the frontlines. At this time, Mississippi plans to issue the first round of vaccines to frontline healthcare workers. 

After frontline workers and long-term care residents have been vaccinated, essential workers will be the next to receive the vaccine. Essential workers include but are not limited to employees in law enforcement, emergency response, food and agriculture, transportation, manufacturing, and education. Some states may prioritize certain industries that have been more affected. Arkansas, for example, intends to prioritize poultry workers, who have taken a hard hit during the pandemic. Each state will make these decisions based on its individual needs and demands. 

Adults with medical conditions that place them at a higher risk for serious illness as well as adults over 65 will be the next group to get immunized. Some states may elect to prioritize vaccinating elderly over 75 first. After that, the vaccine will be open to all healthy adults in the US by May or June if all goes accordingly. 

What You Can Do Now to Protect Yourself

By publication of this article, the first rollout of vaccines should be available in the US. However, it will still be months before all of those at risk of the virus can receive the vaccine. That means we must continue to wear masks and socially distance from one another until the vaccine is readily available to all. Continue to avoid large gatherings and be smart when you must go out in public. If you develop symptoms, quarantine yourself from others immediately, and contact your healthcare provider to schedule a testing appointment. 

Mantachie Rural Healthcare is available Monday through Friday. If you are sick and need an appointment with us, dial 662-282-4226. 

Vitamin D, Coronavirus, and Your Overall Health

New studies reveal interesting and pertinent information about vitamin D and the coronavirus that could just save lives.

Over 80 percent of hospitalized coronavirus patients also have a vitamin D deficiency. These patients also have higher blood levels of inflammatory markers However, there is no link between lower levels and severity of the disease. In another study, Spanish researchers gave 50 patients a prescription of vitamin D. One participant went into intensive care. No participant died. Half of the 26 patients who did not receive the vitamin needed intensive care and two of them passed away.

Another US study found patients with adequate vitamin D levels were less likely to become unconscious or die from covid-19. 

What the Latest Research Means for Treating Covid-19

So what does all of this research mean in the treatment of covid-19? The answer is still unknown. Many new studies are being conducted as we speak. Some research suggests a link between vitamin D and the C-reactive protein, a marker for severe covid-19. Others are looking at how vitamin D relates to coronavirus’ cytokine storm. A cytokine storm occurs when the body’s immune system starts attacking its own cells and tissues rather than fighting the virus. 

Interestingly enough, researchers who took a look back at the 1918-1919 Spanish flu pandemic found that patients with sufficient vitamin D levels were also able to fight off the disease rather than succumb to it. This and other recent studies on vitamin D and its effects on overall health lends more credence to the fact that vitamin D is a significantly vital nutrient to our wellness. 

Vitamin D is also crucial in fighting other diseases such as multiple sclerosis and heart disease. It helps strengthen your bones and prevent osteoporosis, a bone disease that causes the bones to be brittle and weak. Vitamin D can also decrease depression and boost weight loss. It’s important to note that people with vitamin D deficiencies are more likely to experience depression. If you are a frequent sufferer of depression, talk with your healthcare provider about your vitamin D levels. If they are low, your provider can help. 

Why People Have Vitamin D Deficiency

Vitamin D is known as the sunshine vitamin. That means people with a deficiency must suffer from lack of sunshine. Right? Well. You’re not totally wrong, though there are other factors that can contribute. For instance, people with darker skin have a harder time absorbing vitamin D from the sun. Pollution, sunscreen, and living in big cities where buildings block the sun also contribute. And yes, staying indoors too much is a factor. 

How to Get the Vitamin D You Need

First, talk with your provider before beginning any supplement and find out if you need one. Vitamin D overdose is a real thing and it’s just as dangerous as being deficient. In addition to supplements there are many delicious food alternatives that provide the vitamin D your body needs. Options include salmon, sardines, shrimp, egg yolk, and fortified milk, cereal, yogurt, and orange juice. 

Concerned about your vitamin D levels? This another great subject to discuss with your provider during your annual checkup. The end of the year is quickly approaching. If you haven’t scheduled a wellness visit this year, now is the time. Give us a call today to schedule your appointment.

How Will Covid-19 Precautions Affect Flu Season?

Covid-19 continues to spread as traditional flu season approaches. Many are wondering, will covid-19 precautions affect flu season?

As the start of the average flu season begins, epidemiology numbers are the lowest they’ve been in recent history. The only states in the US to show moderate flu activity at the time this was written were Iowa and New Mexico. Current CDC data shows an average of 0.1% of specimens testing positive for the flu.

These incredibly low statistics are likely due to current social distancing, handwashing, and mask guidelines. This data shows that the measures do work to slow the spread of contagious illnesses. 

Numbers are considerably low this year compared to most. But the flu is still something everyone should take seriously. Covid-19 and influenza are similar illnesses with equally similar symptoms. However, each require their own treatment. 

Who Should Be Concerned About Flu and Coronavirus?

Everyone young and old should get the flu shot as a precaution. Pregnant women, the elderly, and those with compromised immune systems are still the most critical recipients of the flu vaccine. Practice the same social distancing, mask, and flu guidelines already in place to help slow the spread of flu germs. 

Both viruses can be deadly for some and mild for others. It’s those who are more likely to suffer from serious consequences who must be considered. 

What Should I do if I Develop Flu or Coronavirus-related Symptoms?

Contact your healthcare provider immediately if you develop a fever, chills, nausea and/or vomiting, or cough. You need to be tested for both viruses and get treatment for your symptoms. Follow their guidelines for social distancing while you are at the clinic. Some clinics will treat and test you from your car. You should quarantine yourself for at least 10 days to help prevent the spread of illness. Exposed household members should do the same for precaution.

Are you experiencing symptoms related to flu or covid-19? Contact Mantachie Rural Health Care immediately to set up an appointment for testing and care. 


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