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Six Foods You Thought Were Healthy But Aren’t

Six Foods You Thought Were Healthy But Aren't

Eating healthy and getting plenty of exercise are two lifestyle choices we heavily promote here at Mantachie Rural Health Care. Learning to eat healthy is challenging–especially in today’s world that offers an overwhelming amount of food options. Many of today’s foods, particularly pre-packaged, store-bought foods, are promoted as “healthy” choices but are actually worse than those obviously unhealthy options like soda and candy. If you’re trying to cut out unnecessary sugar, carbs, or calories from your diet, you’ll want to avoid the following six foods you thought were healthy.

Orange juice and other fruit juices.

The problem with orange juice and other fruit juices is that most of them are made from concentrate–meaning all the “good stuff” in the fruits that make these juices are stripped away and replaced with processed sugar. In fact, juices have as much sugar in each serving as a can of soda. 

Think making your own orange juice will make it healthier? Think again. The juicing fruits of orange are naturally sweet and contain very little fiber resulting in a spike in your blood sugar. The healthiest option is to switch to fruit-infused water. You can easily make your own by adding any of your favorite fruits to a pitcher of water and then refrigerating the water for several hours or overnight to allow the fruits to infuse.

Baked potato

A plain baked potato is high in calories and carbs. Start adding butter, sour cream, and other toppings and you’re adding even more junk to the mix. Opt for a sweet potato instead. 

Store-bought smoothies

Turns out saving yourself time with store-bought smoothies doesn’t actually save your diet. Even the “green” smoothies are high in sugar and low in the actual good stuff that comes from fruits and veggies that supposedly make up these smoothies. Your best bet is to eat your daily servings of fruits and vegetables and make sure you include a serving of greens with each meal. If you must have a smoothie, make your own. Your veggie portions should outweigh your fruit 3:1 and we advise adding flaxseed, chia seeds, or nuts for fiber. 

Flavored yogurt

There’s a reason healthy diets specify plain Greek yogurt instead of suggesting any yogurt on the dairy shelf. None, and we mean none, of the flavored yogurts you find at the grocery store are actually healthy. Like so many other foods that are advertised as healthy when they’re not, flavored yogurts are high in sugar. Satisfy your taste for yogurt by topping a serving of plain Greek yogurt with your choice of fresh fruit. 

Whole wheat

A few decades ago, whole wheat bread was touted as a healthy alternative to white bread. Health experts quickly found out that wasn’t quite the case, however. Actually, whole wheat contains so much sugar it raises your glucose levels faster than most candy bars. 

Dried Fruits

Much like other foods on our list, dried fruits are made unhealthy thanks to too much sugar made from the drying process. Always choose fresh fruit when you’re craving a fruity snack. 

Confused about what’s really nutritious and what’s not? You’re not alone. Our clinic has a registered dietician on staff. Contact us to make an appointment Erica Witcher, RD, CDE.

How to Stay Safe at the Clinic during Non-Coronavirus Health Visits

How to Stay Safe at the Clinic during Non-Coronavirus Health Visit

As we write this, the entire state of Mississippi is experiencing an upswing in confirmed coronavirus diagnosis. It’s more important now than ever to practice CDC guidelines to stay safe and help slow the spread of COVID-19. Staying home and avoiding unnecessary trips to public places including health facilities are among the steps we should take to slow the spread of the virus. But when you become sick with a non-coronavirus related illness or need a prescription refilled, a health visit is unavoidable. Here’s what you can do to stay safe at the clinic.

Find out your clinic’s safety requirements before your visit. 

Most clinics are taking extreme precautions and measures to protect their patients and staff. Find out your clinic’s policies on masks and social distancing, as well as their cleaning and sanitizing protocols. Most clinics will have restrictions in place regarding how many people are allowed inside and how many visitors can accompany a patient even for a non-coronavirus health visit. Expect temperature checks and symptom screenings at every clinic entrance. 

Ask about their protocol for possible coronavirus patients.

Knowing what your clinic is doing to protect you and others from exposure to coronavirus is one way to ease any anxiety you have about your visit. Every clinic should have a protocol in place that keeps patients with coronavirus-related symptoms totally isolated.

Take your own protective measures.

Do your part to protect yourself and help slow the spread of coronavirus. Wear a mask to the clinic and other public places. Sanitize or wash your hands for at least 20 seconds after touching public surfaces. Avoid touching your face, especially your eyes, nose, and mouth and stay 6 feet away from others. 

Mantachie Rural Health Care is committed to protecting you and all of our patients and staff. If you are sick or have an urgent health matter, don’t put off visiting your provider because of coronavirus fears. A known illness or emergency can be more dangerous to your health than the possibility of a virus. We are taking every measure possible to keep our clinic safe. Request an appointment with us at 662-282-4226.

Read next: 4 Dangers to Skipping Your Child’s Wellness Check-up

Study Finds Childhood Picky Eating Is About More Than Food

Good news, parents! A study recently published by the Journal of American Academy of Pediatrics says children who are persistent picky eaters aren’t usually underweight, nor do they have higher BMIs than their peers. And, picky eating is likely a personality trait of your child, not something you caused.

Now that we’ve covered the positive news, let’s look at some unexpected findings. The study divided children into three camps of picky eaters: low, moderate, and high. Children who were moderately or highly selective eaters were more likely to have trouble controlling their emotions. Picky eating may not stand alone but may signal a behavioral health problem you need to discuss with your child’s doctor.

While you may not have caused your child’s pickiness, you can make some changes to help your child expand their palate.

Let go of the demands. Children whose parents restrict certain foods or demand they eat certain foods are more likely to be picky. Around the age of four, where this study began following participants, children are moving into independence. If high anxiety is common among picky eaters, as the study suggests, those children are more likely to avoid new foods and a parent’s insistence won’t help.

Make mealtime fun. Put down the screens. Tell a joke. Talk about your day. Ask your child questions. Make mealtime more about the social interaction of your family than about the food. You’ll relieve the pressure on yourself and your kids.

Set a good example. When your children see you eating new foods or healthy foods, they are more likely to want to try those foods themselves. Start your children on the same diet the rest of your family eats early, before they are two if possible. 

Involve your children in food selection and preparation. You don’t always have time to let your kids help in the kitchen, we get that. Make some time once or twice a week to let your children help select or cook the food you’ll eat. When they have a hand in the preparation, they are more likely to want to try what you’ve cooked.

If you’re concerned about your child’s nutrition or if their picky eating habits might be signs of behavioral health problems like anxiety, ADHD, or depression, we can help. Not only do we have health professionals like nurses and nurse practitioners on our staff, we also employ a registered dietitian and licensed counselors. 

You can read more about the study and its findings through these articles:

‘Picky Eating’ Can Start Early: What Parents Should and Shouldn’t Do About It

Study gives insight — and advice — on picky eating in children

Extreme Picky Eating and Anxiety: A New Study Finds a Surprising Link

For Many Kids, Picky Eating Isn’t Just a Phase, Study Finds

Your Right to Request a Referral to a Specialist

Our doctor and nurse practitioners are family care providers. That means they have experience and are highly educated in a wide range of medical conditions. Most of our patients find that experience and knowledge to be exactly what they need in a time of illness. For some patients with chronic illness or advanced illness, we need to refer them to a specialist. But your health isn’t just in our hands. You can (and should) take an active role in your health. If you think it’s time to see a specialist, ask us for a referral.

When to Ask for a Referral

Some illnesses are easy to diagnose on the first visit. A very sore throat with a fever can be diagnosed and treated as strep throat with a quick test. Other illnesses aren’t that clear. Many diseases and chronic illnesses have similar symptoms. Our providers listen to your symptoms, ask questions, and order tests in an effort to single out the cause of your illness. That means some problems may take more than one visit to get a diagnosis. 

If you’ve visited with your provider more than three times for the same issue and still don’t feel like you’re getting any closer to finding answers, it’s time to talk to your doctor about a specialist referral. Your primary care provider is a partner in your health. We want to see you feel better. Sometimes a doctor with specialised care in a specific area can provide new insight.

What to do Before Requesting a Referral

Before you ask your doctor for a referral, check with your insurance. Most insurance companies have a list of specialists they prefer. You’ll also want to know if seeing that specialist requires a referral. You can check out the potential providers and have an idea of who you’d like to request before your visit.

How to Request a Referral

It can feel awkward asking your doctor to refer you to someone else. Don’t let that stand in the way of better health for you. Your provider wants the best for your health. As a primary care provider they will continue to be involved in your health decisions even if you seek care from a specialist. 

During your visit with your provider, ask if they think it’s time for you to see a specialist or let your doctor know you’re ready to see a specialist. Ask for your doctor’s recommendation of who to see and why that’s their preferred referral. They may have insight into your health history and the specialist’s knowledge that an internet search or your Aunt Clara’s recommendation doesn’t have. If you do not want to see the specialist your doctor recommends, let them know who is covered by your insurance and who you would like to see.

Sometimes a physician to physician referral can result in a faster appointment time. This is not always the case, but it can be a benefit of having your doctor put in the call. Also, if your provider makes the referral, they will know the protocol to ensure your medical records are shared with the specialist. 

Before Your Specialist Appointment

Double-check with your primary care provider’s office to ensure they sent your medical records to the specialist’s office. Also, make sure the new doctor is still covered by your insurance. Make sure you have a list of medications to take with you to the new appointment and check online to fill out any forms ahead of time.

After Your Specialist Appointment

Your primary care provider is still available for all your health needs, even if you’re seeing a specialist for a specific issue. Your doctor should have records of your visits with the specialist so they can make notes in your chart. If you’re seeing a gastroenterologist for a stomach problem, your primary care physician will still be your go-to for acute care illnesses like sinus infections or other chronic diseases like high blood pressure.

Remember, we’re a partner in your health journey, but your true responsibility for your health remains with you. Being open and honest with your provider not only about your health, but about your desire to see a specialist may save time and help you find a diagnosis faster.

Chronic Lyme Disease Highlight Reasons to Prevent Tick Bites

Chronic Lyme Disease Highlight Reasons to Prevent Tick Bites

We’re all happy to see some sunshine and spend some time outside. As we’re recovering from quarantine and continue to practice social distancing, outdoor activities have become even more important this summer. A lot of focus continues to remain on the coronavirus, but that doesn’t mean other diseases have taken a backseat. Now it’s time for your yearly reminder to beware of tick bites which can cause Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

Deer ticks, particularly prevalent in our neck of the woods, are the culprit for Lyme disease. Lyme can be easily treated if caught early, but some patients may suffer long-term consequences of the illness especially if it’s not caught early.

Initial Symptoms

After removing a tick, many people will notice a small, red bump similar to a mosquito bite. This skin irritation is normal and nothing to be concerned about. Complications from that tick bite develop anytime from 3 to 30 after the bite. The most common sign of Lyme disease is a bulls-eye rash at the site of the bite. It expands over the course of several days and may reach 12” in diameter. The rash isn’t painful or itchy. 

Not every case of Lyme disease includes this tell-tale rash. If you do not have the rash, but have the following symptoms it’s time to see your doctor:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Fatigue 
  • Body aches
  • Headache
  • Neck stiffness
  • Swollen lymph nodes

Although many of these symptoms are similar to the Coronavirus, one noticeable difference is Lyme disease does not cause respiratory problems while COVID-19 does.

Antibiotics are the recommended treatment for Lyme disease. Most patients who receive treatment recover with no additional complications.

Chronic Lyme Disease

Even if you have symptoms that disappear without a doctor’s visit, you need to visit your provider if you’ve had a tick bite or been in wooded or grassy areas where ticks like to gather. You may have had a tick bite that you weren’t aware of. Untreated Lyme disease can spread throughout your body and cause long-term health problems. Medical professionals estimate 10-20% of people who receive adequate treatment for Lyme disease continue to have symptoms for weeks, months, and sometimes years after the infection.

Chronic Lyme Disease symptoms include:

  • fatigue
  • restless sleep
  • pain
  • aching joints or muscles
  • pain or swelling in the knees, shoulders, elbows, and other large joints
  • decreased short-term memory or ability to concentrate
  • speech problems

Because these symptoms overlap with many other illnesses, people with chronic Lyme disease are often misdiagnosed. That’s why it’s important to tell your doctor if you’ve experienced a tick bite, even if you don’t have the bulls-eye rash afterward.

Some doctors believe Lyme disease triggers an autoimmune response in some patients which causes additional damage to their body and allows the symptoms to linger.

We currently do not have a specific test or treatment for chronic Lyme disease. That’s the bad news. In good news, your doctor can work with you to get a diagnosis and treat your symptoms. Your doctor may do antibody tests and prescribe medications to treat your symptoms. 

Prevention

The best way to prevent Lyme disease is to avoid deer ticks’ natural habitats like wooded areas and tall grassy areas. But let’s be real. We live in Mississippi. We know camping, fishing, and hunting are our favorite pastimes. With the closure of many indoor activities this summer, the great outdoors will be even more enticing. You can take steps to protect yourself while you enjoy nature.

  • Cover up with long pants and long sleeves when you’re in wooded, grassy areas.
  • Stick to trails and avoid tall grassy areas.
  • Keep your dog on a leash.
  • Apply insect repellent with 20% or higher DEET concentration.
  • Tick proof your yard by mowing regularly and stacking wood in dry, sunny areas.
  • Check your clothing, yourself, your kids, and your pets for ticks after being outside, especially if you’ve been camping, fishing, hiking, or hunting.
  • Remove any tick as soon as you find it. A tick must be attached for 36-48 hours in order to transmit Lyme disease. 
  • Don’t assume you are immuned because you had Lyme disease once. You can be re-infected.

If you’ve experienced a tick bite or have any symptoms of Lyme disease, please contact our office for an appointment with one of our providers. 

340B Care Makes Medication More Affordable

340B Care Makes Medication More Affordable

We hear a lot from our patients and on the news about how expensive medication is. Some of our patients must make a choice each month of whether to purchase groceries or medication. It’s a no-win situation that leaves us and you feeling frustrated. We offer all our patients the 340B card as a way to help manage the costs of medications. 

The 340B card has been around for almost thirty years. Congress enacted the card in 1992 as part of the Public Health Service Act to assist covered entities by “stretching scarce federal resources as far as possible, reaching more eligible patients and providing more comprehensive services.”

When you can afford your medications, we know you’re more likely to be compliant with your health management plan. That means, you’re less likely to need emergency care or hospital admissions. 

Other prescription assistance options

The 340B card makes a big difference for a lot of our patients, but what and how much it covers varies based on whether you have insurance and what it covers. Other patients rely on pharmaceutical company’s direct patient assistance programs to help pay out of pocket costs for medications.

Not every drug company offers a patient assistance program, and how much those programs cover varies. Some programs help patients cover large co-pays while others may cover the entire cost of the drug for uninsured patients.

Here’s the bottom line. If you’re struggling to pay for expensive medications, you are not alone. Medications for chronic illnesses can be expensive. Don’t let the expense keep you from taking care of your health. The longer you put off diagnosis and treatment of problems, the harder it will be to get your health under control. And the more long term damage your body will suffer. 

We can help you find ways to afford the medications you need. Whether it’s through the 340B program our clinic offers or assisting you with finding a patient assistance program to help cover the costs. If you are one of our patients, be honest with your provider about the hardship of paying for your medication. If you aren’t one of our patients, it’s easy to fix that. Call us at 662-282-4226 for your first appointment. 

4 Dangers to Skipping Your Child’s Wellness Check-Up

4 Dangers to Skipping Your Child's Wellness Check-Up

In the midst of COVID-19 quarantine, healthcare providers noticed a worrying trend. Parents, concerned about their children’s health, postponed their child’s wellness check-ups. Was that vaccination or height and weight check really worth exposing their family to a deadly virus? 

Thankfully in Mississippi, the virus has not been as rampant as in other parts of the country. As we slowly return to a new normal, it’s time for parents to reschedule those wellness check-ups. Here’s what happens if they don’t.

Resurgence of eradicated diseases

We were already seeing higher instances of measles and other diseases for which we have vaccines. Some parents chose not to vaccinate their children and others chose to alter the schedule of vaccines. We’ve written about the dangers of those practices before. What we’re seeing now is parents who would ordinarily have their child vaccinated on a schedule have skipped or pushed back those vaccinations. The last thing we want is measles or other diseases compounding the threat of the Coronavirus our healthcare system is fighting.

Vaccination schedules are based on the ages when children are most vulnerable to specific diseases. By skipping those vaccines, children are wide open for infection. If your child was scheduled for vaccinations that were postponed during the height of the Coronavirus, it’s time to schedule those vaccines and wellness check-ups now.

Delayed intervention for developmental delays

First-time parents are less likely to notice developmental delays because they have nothing for comparison. If Baby Tim isn’t crawling when he should or Little Jane isn’t starting to speak on time, your child’s pediatrician can help you decide if it’s time to sound the alarm or wait it out. 

Your pediatrician is your partner in your child’s health and growth. They’ve monitored hundreds (often thousands) of children over their career. In addition, they and their staff know the community resources available to you. If your child needs early intervention, they can help. Any parent of a child with developmental delays will tell you that early intervention is key to helping your child live their best life.

Unseen medical problems

Once a child reached school-age years, many parents forgot about yearly wellness exams even before the pandemic. Wellness exams for school-aged children include vision and hearing checks. These senses greatly affect your child’s quality of life, but you may not notice small difficulties. The wellness exams also include blood pressure checks along with height, weight, and BMI measurements.

Lack of partnership

As we mentioned earlier, your pediatrician is your partner in your child’s health. Their input during the early years of your child’s life is invaluable, but so is their contribution as your child gets older. They can help with difficult conversations around puberty, drug and alcohol use, and sex. No doctor is a substitute for parental involvement, but they can also help you find your way through these conversations. They can be another adult resource for your child as they age. Eventually, they will become an adult. By establishing healthy habits of yearly wellness visits and trust in their medical doctor, you’ll help your child continue a healthy life long after they’ve flown the nest.

If it’s time for your child’s wellness check-up or if you missed a check-up over the last few months, now’s the time to schedule your appointment. We’re keeping our offices sanitized and following the CDC’s best practices to protect you, your family, and our staff.

Light Up the Night: Fireworks Safety

Light Up the Night: Fireworks Safety

Something about fireworks in the summertime brings a community together. Every year thousands of people light up their own yards and streets with fireworks. In Mississippi, the stands are on every corner in the weeks leading up to the Fourth of July. We want your family to remember summer fireworks as a fun time, not that time dad or sister had to go to the ER. So before you light the fuse on your first Roman candle take a look at these fireworks safety standards.

  • Never allow young children to handle fireworks
  • Older children should use them only under close adult supervision
  • Never use fireworks while impaired by drugs or alcohol
  • Anyone using fireworks or standing nearby should wear protective eyewear
  • Pay attention to others lighting fireworks and steer clear of them
  • Never hold lighted fireworks in your hands
  • Never light them indoors
  • Only use them away from people, houses and flammable material
  • Never point or throw fireworks at another person even as a joke
  • Never carry fireworks in your pocket, the friction could set them off
  • Only light one device at a time and maintain a safe distance after lighting
  • Never ignite devices in a glass or metal container
  • Do not try to re-light or handle malfunctioning fireworks
  • Soak both spent and unused fireworks in water for a few hours before discarding
  • Keep a bucket of water nearby to fully extinguish fireworks that don’t go off or in case of fire
  • Never use illegal fireworks (legal fireworks have the manufacturer’s name and direction on them; illegal fireworks do not)
  • Never try to make your own fireworks
  • Keep pets indoors to reduce the risk they will run away or injure themselves trying to escape the noise
  • Keep 500 feet from the launching pad
  • Don’t pick up the debris immediately after shooting fireworks. The debris may still be hot or may reignite or explode at any time.
  • Teach your children to stop, drop, and roll if they are hit by a firework and their clothing catches fire.

In case of injuries

For eye injuries:

  • Don’t rub or touch the eye
  • Don’t try to wash the eye or apply ointment
  • Seek medical attentional immediately

For burns:

  • Carefully clip any clothing away from the burn.
  • Make sure the burn is clean and dry.
  • If the burn is larger than the palm of your hand or affects the face, ears, toes or fingers, seek medical attention. 
  • Apply cool water but avoid soaking the burn in ice. 
  • Over-the-counter pain medications can be used to treat pain from the burn. 
  • Small burns can be treated at home with antibiotic ointment or aloe. 
  • Seek medical attention if the burns don’t heal.

Herb Garden Yields Multiple Health Benefits

Herb Garden Yields Multiple Health Benefits

In the South, everyone knows someone who has a garden, even if they don’t have one themselves. Getting started with a vegetable garden can be a daunting task, especially if you have a small yard or pets who like to dig. If you’re looking for an easy way to start gardening with optimal results consider starting with an herb garden.

Health Benefits

Herbs themselves offer health benefits. Sage may improve memory. Peppermint is known to relieve IBS symptoms. Turmeric is anti-inflammatory. And basil can improve your immunity. 

In addition to the direct benefits of herbs, gardening provides its own benefits. The physical work of gardening counts toward your exercise quota for the day. It also improves mental well-being and relieves stress.

Saves Money

Have you bought herbs at the grocery store lately? Whether you purchase herbs dried or fresh, they can cost a pretty penny. Having fresh herbs right outside your door allows you the benefit without the cost. Herbs may be grown easily through seeds, which are generally inexpensive. Many herbs grow in plentiful amounts which allows you to share with neighbors and friends.

Easy to grow in small spaces

Herbs look as pretty as some shrubs and greenery. You can plant them in front or side flower beds even if you don’t have room for a garden in the back. Apartment dwellers can plant in pretty pots, which take up much less space than a truck patch garden.

Learn something

Growing plants from seeds teaches us all something. We can learn about different varieties of plants and how they grow best. Some herbs like well-drained soil while others prefer to keep it wet. Researching different varieties of herbs and how they grow best is a great exercise for the entire family.

You can also learn new recipes and which herbs go best with certain dishes. Being able to grow your own food gives you some independence regardless of how the shelves at the grocery store look. 

A starting point

The most common and easiest herbs to grow in pots include:

  • Mint
  • Sage
  • Rosemary
  • Basil
  • Thyme
  • Chives
  • Bay
  • Parsley

Don’t stop here. Research different varieties of herbs or which herbs go best with your favorite dishes. Don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone and try growing something different. You might find a new favorite.

Boost Your Immune System this Summer

Boost Your Immune System This Summer

The sun’s shining and businesses are starting to reopen. While we’re relieved our numbers of COVID19 patients hasn’t overwhelmed our hospitals and medical system, we continue to be concerned about the threat of the virus. The majority of the most serious cases have happened in older adults with pre-existing conditions. This means keeping ourselves healthy has never been more important.

The best way to protect ourselves from any germs is to wash your hands using soap and water for twenty minutes and stay away from people who are sick. We can also protect others by wearing a mask when we go in public in case we’re the ones who are sick and don’t know it.

In addition to those important steps, we can boost our immune system with some pretty basic steps.

Eat Well

Our immune system comes from our gut. So, it is especially important during these times of reopening our world that we incorporate foods that boost our immune system. These foods and vitamins include:

  1. Protein – this helps with healing and recovery so make sure each meal or snack has a good source such as lean meats, eggs, seafood, poultry, nuts, seeds, soy products, etc
  2. Vitamin A – prevents infection. Foods that contain Vit A are sweet potatoes, broccoli, and carrots.
  3. Vitamin C – fruits like oranges, red bell pepper, etc contain vitamin c which helps build up the immune system.
  4. Vitamin E – foods such as cereal, almonds, and peanut butter contain this vitamin and is good to help with building immunity
  5. Zinc – helps with would healing. Foods such as milk, lean meats, and whole grains contain zinc.
  6. Other vitamins to help with immunity are B6, B12, Copper, Folate, Selinium, and Iron. These come in a variety of different foods. This is why it is so important to strive for a balanced plate of whole grain, vegetables, and lean proteins with each meal and snack. 

Sleep Soundly

A National Institutes of Health study shows adults who sleep fewer than 6 hours every night are more prone to illness. Adults should get at least 7 hours of sleep every night. Teens need 8-10 hours of sleep and children up to 14 hours of sleep. So these long days with no school where your teen sleeps in until almost noon may be helping him stay healthy.

Some environmental factors which we can control that affect sleep include:

  1. Alcohol (which may help you fall asleep initially but is more likely to disrupt your sleep later and keep you from getting in the hours you need)
  2. Heavy meals
  3. Nicotine
  4. Caffeine
  5. Blue lights from electronics

We can’t control all the factors that lead to a poor night’s sleep. Stress, tension, anxiety, and depression can all interrupt our sleep. And we can agree there’s plenty of all those emotions to go around right now. If you’re struggling with these issues talk to a counselor. Finding strategies to cope with stress and depression will not only help you sleep more soundly but it can boost your immune system as well.

Some illnesses such as acid reflux or allergies and sinus problems may also inhibit sound sleep. You’ll want to talk to your medical provider about treatment not only for your sleep but for your long term health.

Water it down

Water is important to our overall health which is important for our immune system. See how that works? We all need to drink enough to make our urine pale yellow. Let your body be your guide. When you’re thirsty drink until you aren’t thirsty anymore. 

Exercise, especially outside in warm weather, will use up our water stores more quickly. Keeping a bottle of water on hand during and after exercise is an important part of staying hydrated.

The internet has plenty of suggestions on how much water you need to drink every day. As long as you are staying hydrated–the pale yellow urine will let you know if you are–you’re doing great. 

Move it, Move it

Our body systems weren’t built to be sedentary. We’re made to work and exercise regularly. Especially for those of us who are used to working hard but have been laid off this sudden shift can be hard on our bodies. Plan some time to exercise. Walk around the neighborhood. Hike where you can observe social distancing rules. Ride your bike. Plant a garden. We can do a lot without fancy gym equipment.

Many exercise gurus and gyms are offering virtual workouts. Find one and join in. 

In addition to making our bodies healthier, exercise can help alleviate stress.

We can’t offer a fool-proof way to protect yourselves against the Coronavirus. If we could we’d all be back at work with no concerns by now. We can help you create a healthier body so you can fight back against all types of illnesses including the current COVID-19 crisis.


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